Opinion: Teaching - an easy escape route from law? You've got to be kidding

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  • I agree

    I think it's ridiculous that City types will get special treatment on this. I heard on the news that the government is looking at offering these people special recruitment advice to get them back into work as quickly as possible. what about all the people in the lower parts of society that have also been made redundant? there's no word of a special scheme to help former woollies workers back into work is there?
    I've no doubt many former lawyers could make very good teachers but the fact is teaching requires very different skills to lawyering so they need to train just like everyone else. Fast tracking them through is an insult to all the people that have worked hard to gain their teacher training positions, especially when the former lawyers, who might just be choosing teaching because they can't think of anything else, will finish their training early and will be able to have the pick of the jobs.

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  • Lawyers aren't intellectually superior

    Why do lawyer's always think they're brighter than everyone else? Just because someone went to a top uni doesn't mean they will be good at everything - to be a good teacher you need more than just good grades.

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  • Moan moan moan

    Marjorie, the point is that "City Types" usually function at a far more complex level than the average Job Centre employee. They need special provisions to help them find new employment (and have paid for it in spades through their taxes). Woolies employees, while loveable, are not trained for anything and do not need specialist assistance. We can buy our shopping from machines now; the same is not true of bespoke legal advice.

    I agree, though, that good lawyers do not necessarily make good teachers.

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  • Re: Fast track?

    I find this no different than someone who has done a non-law degree opting to becoming a lawyer by doing the GDL/CPE. The GDL/CPE is usually a one year course (full-time), and some lawyers and law-graduates may feel insulted that a 3 year law degree can be cramped into a year course. Yet many of those on these conversion courses turn out to be great lawyers. So only time will tell whether this scheme will be successfuly or not.

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  • Intellectually superior?

    A spokesman for University said: “We are extremely disappointed and upset that a colleague has chosen to raise issues that were settled with his consent some years ago. If he continues to have issues with the management of examinations, he ought to raise them internally.”

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  • trainee

    Clearly there is a cost implication as well though as non-law students need the GDL fees to be paid in addition to the LPC.

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  • i myself am a current gradute of a law degree.. i have always had the prospectus of going into teaching (and due to the current economic climate) and though it may not be easy i can agree that some may see it as a easy escape route from law but at the same time this arguement can be seen as a double edged sword reason bieng that those who also pursue the legal profession spend a lot of time and a LOT of money for something that they may not be able to go into later on thus in return they want security with a profession just like anyone else that they have pursude

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