8 September 1997

The Lawyer

  • 'The rottwiler lawyers will have a field day

    12-Sep-1997

    Tim Hardy looks at how the new broadcasters' code on privacy has been received. Tim Hardy is a specialist in press and broadcasting complaints at Cameron McKenna.The Broadcasting Standards Commission (BSC) - formerly the Broadcasting Complaints Commission - published its first code on fairness and privacy for broadcasters on 24 November.The code is a welcome development. Previously, complainants had little to guide them regarding the commission's attitude ...

  • 1 Crown Office Row loses a second clerk

    9-Sep-1997

    PROMINENT criminal and civil set 1 Crown Office Row has lost its second senior clerk in just six months - midway through a major constitutional shake-up.The departure of Douglas Neave so soon after he was called in to replace longstanding senior clerk Patrick Duane has raised eyebrows within the Inns of Court.It comes at a time when the set's head, Richard Ferguson QC, is no longer technically its leader, as the old constitution has been scrapped and a new ...

  • A reform revolution

    9-Sep-1997

    The introduction of a Scottish Parliament will keep lawyers busy, says Mike Dailly.Those lawyers who think that devolution will have little or no impact on their daily routine should consider this: 129 politicians are gathered together and left alone in a large room in Edinburgh; they are told they can initiate, amend or repeal any laws in Scotland - excluding a few areas reserved to Westminster. What will happen?For the first time in almost 300 years, law reform ...

  • Advertise the caring face of the profession

    12-Sep-1997

    The legal profession should shout about its pro bono work from the highest hill rather than allowing only the bad aspects to be publicised, says Tony Michaelson-Yeates. Tony Michaelson-Yeates is a solicitor.Only two weeks after Peta Sweet, the director of the Solicitors' Pro Bono Group (SPBG), attended a conference of the Yorkshire Union of Law Societies, the Law Society's Yorkshire and North East regional office decided to set up a pro bono ...

  • Alastair Thomson & Partners is no more

    9-Sep-1997

    Fifty-year-old insurance litigation practice Alastair Thomson & Partners ceased practising last week with all five equity partners going to different firms.When The Lawyer revealed the impending break-up of the London firm in May the destinations of all the partners were not known. A source believed at the time that senior partner Alastair Simpson might have been retiring.However, on 1 September he joined the professional negligence department of Tonbridge practice ...

  • Andrew Clay on making taking trade secrets a criminal offence. Andrew Clay is a partner at Hammond Suddards in Leeds.

    12-Sep-1997

    The Law Commission's recently published proposals to make the taking of trade secrets a criminal offence deserves a warm welcome.At present, taking trade secrets is not a criminal offence because mere information, however sensitive, can not constitute property for the purposes of s.1(1) of the Theft Act 1968. This frequently leads to the ludicrous situation where the only criminal remedy available to a company whose valuable trade secrets have been taken ...

  • Applications overload

    12-Sep-1997

    I refer to the letter from Imrana Quraishi in The Lawyer, 18 November.May I suggest that it is not that firms are being discourteous when they do not reply to the enormous number of applicants for training contracts, rather that it does not make economic and/or business sense.When you look at the cost and time involved in replying to all applicants, rather than just those who are asked for interview, it becomes clear that harsh decisions have ...

  • Appointments mark end of era

    9-Sep-1997

    The appointment of two solicitors to sit as deputy High Court judges has signalled the end of the Bar's traditional monopoly of the senior judicial post.Lawrence Collins and Arthur Marriott, who made legal history earlier this year when they were the first solicitors appointed as Queen's Counsel, have again broken new ground in being authorised to sit as deputy High Court judges.Announcing the move, the Lord Chancellor, Lord Irvine of Lairg QC, said ...

  • Are privacy laws the answer to harassment?

    9-Sep-1997

    Following the death of Diana, Princess of Wales, many have questioned whether the law could have played a more protective role. Elizabeth Davidson asks lawyers for their views.The Lawyer asked leading lawyers to give their response to calls for the introduction of a privacy law following the death of Princess Diana.Razi Mireskandari of Simons Muirhead & Burton says privacy should be provided through the development of existing common law and not statute. A "celebrity" ...

  • Arthur Andersen merger denied by Lisbon firm

    12-Sep-1997

    Leading Portuguese firm AM Pereira SAragga Leal Oliveira Martins has insisted that it has no plans to merge with Arthur Andersen but has admitted being in talks with the accountant's captive Spanish law firm, Garrigues Andersen.The revelation follows Lisbon press reports that merger plans between AM Pereira and Andersens had fallen through after disagreements over the purchase price. But senior partner Luis SAragga Leal said that money was never discussed and that the ...

  • Barrister seeks damages after Turkish Fox & Gibbons stint

    9-Sep-1997

    A UK barrister who was recruited to jointly head Fox & Gibbons' Turkish office has started industrial tribunal proceedings against his former employers.Ian Philliskirk, who joined the Middle East firm in January, quit after two months because he was unhappy with the way the office was being run.He is now seeking damages based on his claims that the firm breached his contract.Philliskirk had replaced Fox & Gibbons' partner Christopher Dixon ...

  • BAT counsel to join Debenhams

    12-Sep-1997

    BAT Industries company secretary David Wilson is to leave after four years to join retailer Debenhams as general counsel in time for its planned demerger from the Burton Group.A spokeswoman for Debenhams confirmed that Wilson's arrival on 5 January had already been announced internally."David will be joining Debenhams as general counsel and company secretary and will report directly to the chief executive, Terry Green," she said.The move is part ...

  • Benson slams paparazzi

    9-Sep-1997

    Mohamed Al Fayed's UK legal adviser Stuart Benson has attacked the tactics used by the paparazzi after travelling to Paris to help Al Fayed's French legal team following the death of Diana, Princess of Wales, and Dodi Fayed.Benson, who has been advising Fayed since he left Dibb Lupton Alsop, flew to Paris several times to gather information for Al Fayed.He viewed Ritz Hotel security videos of the paparrazi and spoke to security staff and Dodi Fayed's ...

  • Bournemouth appoints new head of law

    9-Sep-1997

    Chris Fogarty reportsNew unitary authority Bournemouth Borough Council has appointed solicitor Tim Martin as its head of law and administration.Martin takes up the £45,000 job after leaving West Oxfordshire District Council where he had been solicitor to the council since 1993.In 1989 he joined Gateshead Metropolitan Borough Council after earlier working in private practice in Newcastle and Durham. Martin replaces Lisa Dovey who left to ...

  • Brodsky jumps ship

    12-Sep-1997

    Ashurst Morris Crisp partner Scott Brodsky is leaving the firm to join Linklaters in Singapore. Brodsky is currently based in Singapore and will join his new firm early next year as partner working in its global projects practice.

  • Camerons swoops on Poland arm of US firm

    12-Sep-1997

    Cameron McKenna has taken five Polish lawyers from the Warsaw office of US firm White & Case to bolster its own energy practice in the city.Dariusz Mioduski, Andrzej Blach, Tomasz Minkiewicz, Dariusz Turek and Rafal Hajduk have joined the office in anticipation of an increase in projects in the energy sector.The firm advised the Polish government on the recently enacted Energy ...

  • Can justice go global?

    9-Sep-1997

    The farcical show trial of Pol Pot only serves as a reminder of the unsatisfactory nature of international criminal law. Andrea Dahlberg examines the problem. Andrea Dahlberg is a solicitor at Simmons & Simmons.A frail old man with a walking stick, a crowd in a jungle clearing - this was the trial of Pol Pot, as filmed by an American journalist recently. After a series of denunciations before a crowd whose reactions appeared choreographed it resulted in a life sentence for, ...

  • China opens doors so far and no further

    12-Sep-1997

    The Chinese government has confirmed that it is ready to improve access for foreign law firms to the Chinese market, but has insisted that the ban on practices employing Chinese lawyers should stay.The proposals are contained in a revised services offer China presented to the World Trade Organisation (WTO) in Geneva last week as part of its bid to join the global trade body.Beijing has agreed to get rid of the current ceiling of 80 foreign law firms permitted ...

  • Collyer-Bristow three to set up matrimonial firm

    12-Sep-1997

    LEADING family law firm Collyer-Bristow is set to lose more than half of its matrimonial team when three partners leave the practice next spring.The head of its family and matrimonial practice group, Jeremy Levison, is setting up a family law firm with fellow matrimonial partners Claire Meltzer and Simon Pigott.The three will leave Collyer-Bristow, which is regarded as one of the UK's best matrimonial practices, in May 1998.The new practice will ...

  • Commercial practice goes for US management system

    9-Sep-1997

    COMMERCIAL firm Jeffrey Green Russell has revealed that it deliberately Americanised its IT system so that it could keep up with the latest technological developments.The London firm has chosen a new practice management system from US suppliers CMS Data at an overall cost of £300,000, which includes installation costs and training for the firm's staff.It signed ...

  • Conflict of interest forces Perth firm to second partner

    9-Sep-1997

    A SENIOR partner at Australian firm Freehill Hollingdale & Page is going on sabbatical to resolve a conflict of interest which nearly scuppered the firm's merger with Perth firm Parker & Parker.It has been revealed that the merger, announced last month, was in danger of not going ahead after Freehills' partners refused to accept demands that senior litigation partner Konrad de Kerloy leave.De Kerloy acted for client Bell Group Finance two years ago ...

  • Cost of Irish Army injury cases comes under fire

    12-Sep-1997

    A flood of compensation claims by Irish Army personnel for damaged hearing has plunged Ireland's legal profession into fresh controversy over fees.So far, 1,000 cases have been dealt with, costing the state IR£350m - and earning the legal teams who handled them IR£5m.But, with 9,000 cases pending, Irish Defence Minister Michael Smith warned that the final bill could reach IR£2bn - with millions going in legal costs.Smith has ...

  • CPS faces double race claim from prosecutors

    12-Sep-1997

    CLAIMS of racial discrimination have been lodged against the Crown Prosecution Service by two CPS prosecutors.Neeta Amin, represented by solicitor David Gibson of Russell Jones & Walker, is taking a case against her employers, alleging victimisation contrary to the Race Discrimination and Sex Discrimination Acts when she worked at Camberwell CPS.Her partly-heard case at London South Industrial Tribunal has been adjourned until 30 March.Amin, now working ...

  • Cure sought for incorrect prescription

    9-Sep-1997

    Luton County Court is to be the scene for an appeal which, if successful, could spawn a major new class action in respect of alleged medical negligence over the prescription of human insulin for diabetics.The pending hearing is a unique case brought by litigant-in-person, Derek Beatty, 46, who was diagnosed a diabetic when he was 28 years old. Beatty claims that a change in his prescription 12 years ago from animal insulin to human insulin resulted ...

  • De facto solicitors?

    9-Sep-1997

    The reports of barristers "voting with their feet" as well as members of a tax specialist set being "outsourced to City and commercial firms" makes me wonder whether this is the beginning of the fusion of the profession. Although barristers state that they are not "de facto solicitors", by taking on the more commercial facets of the solicitors' profession they may be closing that so-called divide.Name and address withheld

  • Deacons expands in Far East

    9-Sep-1997

    Asia-Pacific firm Deacons Graham & James has announced the expansion of its Far East practice by setting up an association with Singapore firm Yeo Wee Kiong.The firm is also setting up its own office in the country and has applied to the Singapore Government for an international legal licence.Under Singapore laws foreign law firms cannot practice domestic law and cannot merge or share income with local firms. But Yeo Wee Kiong is allowed to work in formal association ...

  • Decision expected any day on former miners' group action

    12-Sep-1997

    JUDGMENT is expected before Christmas on the largest personal injury action ever heard in the UK - the British Coal respiratory disease litigation trial - which could benefit 50,000 ex-miners.The trial is a multi-party action brought by a group of miners. They allege they have developed chronic obstructive airways disease (COAD) - including emphysema, asthma, and chronic bronchitis - caused by exposure to mine dust and nitrous fumes while working underground at collieries.

  • Dundas elbows in on Garretts

    9-Sep-1997

    The management of Arthur Andersens' existing English law firm, Garretts, is to be shaken up in a bid to accommodate Edinburgh law firm Dundas & Wilson, which announced it was joining Andersens' network last week.Dundas' chairman Neil Cochran and managing partner Chris Campbell will both, once registered as foreign lawyers in England, become partners in Garretts and ...

  • Eversheds sets up lobby group on social chapter

    12-Sep-1997

    Eversheds has recruited over 80 top UK companies and organisations to a new group it has formed to lobby the Government on elements of the EU's social chapter.The Employers' Forum on Social Policy (EFSP), which was launched last month and will also serve as a marketing tool to attract new clients, was the brainchild of Eversheds' head of employment Elaine Aarons."A ...

  • Financing

    9-Sep-1997

    Frere Cholmeley Bischoff advised Threadneedle on conversion of 18 Allied Dunbar unit trusts to Threadneedle Investment Funds ICVC an open ended investment company

  • Financing

    9-Sep-1997

    Clifford Chance advised Canary Wharf on obtaining £200m limited recourse financing for Citibank's new European HQ. Allen & Overy advised Hypobank

  • Financing

    9-Sep-1997

    Ashurst Morris Crisp acted for four separate property companies - Chi Cheung Treasury

  • Flotation

    9-Sep-1997

    White & Case advised Poland's largest merchant bank, Bank Handlowy on its $194m flotation on the Warsaw Stock Exchange. Clifford Chance advised Schroders, the arrangers of the deal.

  • Flotations

    12-Sep-1997

    Jerrard Saunders Donn acted for STG Holdings on their recent introduction to the Ofex market and a two for five placing with clawback.

  • Flotations

    12-Sep-1997

    Macfarlanes advised Yves St Laurent menswear distributor Marchpole Holdings on its flotation with a planned market capitalisation of £140m to £165m. Ashurst Morris Crisp acted for Societe Generale Turnbull Securities

  • Garrets opens doors to first batch of graduates

    9-Sep-1997

    Arthur Andersen-tied law firm Garretts has taken on its first batch of trainees in its four-year history.The 17 trainees, almost all from provincial universities, will be joining the firm's offices in Birmingham, Leeds, London, Manchester and Reading.Up until now Garretts has grown to become a 128-fee earner firm through the lateral hiring of qualified assistants and partners.Julia Chain, Garretts' managing partner, claimed that the arrival ...

  • Garretts partner advises on controversial buy-back deal

    9-Sep-1997

    Garretts' Leeds corporate partner Roland Todd has advised Alternative Investment Market-listed company Gartland Whalley & Barker on arranging a unique and controversial compulsory buy-back from investors with less than 50 shares.Garretts helped the company float in September 1996 with a reverse takeover of Select Industries. But the value of Select Industries' shares had declined steeply over the years, said Todd, and 2,000 shareholders had only one or two shares ...

  • Govt tells Law Society and Bar to devise vocational loan scheme

    12-Sep-1997

    THE Law Society and the Bar Council have been asked by the government to draw up proposals for a loan scheme to help budding lawyers fund their vocational training.The move follows a meeting between Bar Council chairman Robert Owen QC, Phillip Sycamore, the president of the Law Society, and Education Minister Kim Howells last Wednesday.Howells asked the pair to submit their own proposals for a loan scheme after they told him of the enormous debt problems faced ...

  • Haringey prosecutes writer of racist letter

    9-Sep-1997

    Solicitors at Haringey Council have broken new ground by successfully prosecuting a man for sending a racially abusive letter to a parking control officer.Haringey was the first council to successfully prosecute someone under the Malicious Communications Act, after senior litigation assistant Michael Munn took John Duggan to court for writing the letter.The letter, sent into to the council after a parking officer had given him a £40 ticket, ...

  • Hayley Stallard on Camelot's unsuccessful case against 49's. Hayley Stallard is head of the advertising and marketing law group at Field Fisher Waterhouse.

    9-Sep-1997

    In the case Camelot Group v William Hill London and ors (18 August 1997), the Deputy Chief Magistrate at Bow Street decided that the predominant features of the 49's game of chance promoted by bookmakers were those of betting and not of a lottery.However, his attempt to distinguish between the overlapping categories of betting, gaming and lotteries is unconvincing and has failed to clarify the law in this area.Like the National Lottery, ...

  • High revenue, high premium

    9-Sep-1997

    Write to: The Editor, The Lawyer, 50 Poland Street, London W1V 4AX, Fax 0171 734 0534 I read with amusement that lawyers are complaining about 50 per cent increases in their Solicitors' Indemnity Fund (SIF) premiums.Aren't they lucky? I work from home in the intellectual property and competition law fields and have done so for more than three years.I have never made a claim on the fund. My contributions for the forthcoming ...

  • Highland Council legal head loses out in cost-cutting move

    12-Sep-1997

    Highland Council in the north-west of Scotland has made its legal director Marion Notman redundant and merged the legal team with another department as part of a cost-cutting restructuring.The council is having to make savings of £14m and councillors have decided to achieve this by merging departments and disposing of 25 senior managers.The deputy chief executive was one of the losers in the restructuring.The local authority's public relations ...

  • HK judges named

    12-Sep-1997

    Two English judges, Lord Hoffmann and Lord Nicholls of Birkenhead, featured in a list of 33 judicial appointments announced by the Hong Kong government last week. Lord Hoffman and Lord Nicholls were appointed as non-permanent judges of the Hong Kong's Court of Final Appeal. Their appointment follows an agreement in September by the Lord Chancellor, Lord Irvine, and the Chief Justice of Hong Kong, Mr Justice Andrew Li, that two serving British judges would be made available to the ...

  • Howard Liebman

    12-Sep-1997

    In The Lawyer, 25 November, a news item, "Morgan Lewis & Bockius beefs up its tax practice", stated that Howard Liebman was in Morgan Lewis's London office. He is in fact based at the firm's Brussels practice.

  • Identity clarified

    12-Sep-1997

    I should like to make it clear that, after leaving Alsop Wilkinson's London office in 1996, I joined Garretts as head of their northern litigation practice.I have no connection with senior Guinness property lawyer David Harlock referred to in your front-page news story of 25 November.David Harlock,GarrettsLeeds.

  • In brief: Addleshaws wins Leeds TEC contract

    12-Sep-1997

    Addleshaw Booth & Co has won a three-year fixed term contract as legal adviser to Leeds TEC. The move is linked to the appointment of the firm's corporate finance partner, Sandra Humphrey, as company secretary to the TEC.

  • In brief: Bird & Bird poaches BT man as partner

    9-Sep-1997

    Allan Sanderson, former BT head of commercial litigation, has joined international law firm Bird & Bird as a partner. "After 12 years with BT, Allan brings with him a wealth of experience in handling disputes that can arise in the telecoms industry," said David Kerr, head of the firm's communications group. Sanderson, who joined the 35-partner firm at the beginning of the month, was unavailable ...

  • In brief: Crime and Disorder Bill is published

    12-Sep-1997

    The Home Office launched its Crime and Disorder Bill last week, introducing new offences of racially aggravated assault and harassment, abolishing the presumption that under-10s cannot commit a crime and setting up a new Youth Justice Board and youth offender teams. The five-part Bill also extends the custodial term for sexual crimes by 10 years and by five years for violent crimes.

  • In brief: Cunliffe tempted out of retirement

    9-Sep-1997

    Former McKenna & Co pensions lawyer John Cunliffe has been tempted out of retirement after just two months to become deputy chairman of Hogg Robinson Trustees. Cunliffe, a leading occupational pensions lawyer, retired as head of McKenna & Co's (now Cameron McKenna) employee benefits group in June at the age of 62, the firm's official retirement age. In his new post, which he took up last week, he will work with Hogg Robinson Trustees chief executive Steven Ross to develop ...

  • In brief: Diana memorial fund lawyer joins Garretts

    12-Sep-1997

    Mishcon de Reya assistant Bernadette O'Reilly, who helped draw up the deed to establish the Diana, Princess of Wales Memorial Fund, is leaving to join Garretts where she will work under private client partner Judith Powell. Mishcons said it still had partner Chris Allen and four assistants to do the fund work. Trust partner Martyn Gowar at

  • In brief: Dibb Lupton Alsop sounds union warning

    9-Sep-1997

    Dibb Lupton Alsop is predicting a "winter of discontent" following a survey of 170 employers and 50 trade unions which revealed widespread fears that industrial disputes will soar. Forty-two per cent of the unionised employers surveyed had experienced industrial unrest over the past 12 months, with the number of days lost due to industrial action trebling from 415,000 the year before to 1.3 million this year.

  • In brief: Dispute leads to writ for firm's dissolution

    12-Sep-1997

    Manchester firm Slater Heelis has issued a High Court writ to dissolve its 225-year-old partnership in what is believed to be a bid to remove banking and insolvency partner Peter Hardman. Neither Hardman nor the partners at Slater Heelis would comment on the cause of the row, but Slater Heelis lawyers claimed that the firm, which currently has 21 partners, will reform once the dispute has been resolved.

  • In brief: Eversheds finds head for French desk

    9-Sep-1997

    Eversheds has appointed French lawyer Olivier Morel to head its new French desk which will advise British and French companies working in both countries. Morel joins Eversheds from a 13-month stint as executive director of the London First Centre, an organisation that promoted the capital as a business centre.Before that he was briefly the practice manager at Birmingham chambers 5 Fountain ...

  • In brief: First head of national business for Pinsents

    12-Sep-1997

    Pinsent Curtis, which has offices in Birmingham, Leeds and London, has appointed Philip O'Connor as its first national head of business development. O'Connor joins from Boeing in the US, and previously worked for Continental Oil, Rank Xerox and Ernst & Young in senior sales and marketing positions.

  • In brief: Get in at The Sharp End - for charity

    12-Sep-1997

    There is still time to buy the original drawings for The Lawyer's popular cartoon The Sharp End while at the same time helping a children's charity. Fran Orford, the cartoon's creator, is putting the originals up for sale, and donating the proceeds of the sale to charity. So far he has raised £200. For more details telephone Fran on 01422 845359.

  • In brief: Green form pilot scheme

    9-Sep-1997

    THE article in The Lawyer, 2 September, on the Legal Aid Board's green form pilot scheme reported that the deadline had been extended for "applications in the wake of a poor turnout for the scheme".In fact the Legal Aid Board concluded the application stage last year. It is now in the process of signing contracts with firms. We extended the deadline for the signing of contracts at the request of firms mainly to take account of the holiday period.The pilot ...

  • In brief: Healthy response to multi-party proposals

    9-Sep-1997

    The Legal Aid Board (LAB) has received 50, mainly supportive, responses to its proposals to franchise multi-party action work. The consultation period for the proposed scheme to set up a panel of about a dozen law firms in England and Wales to do multi-party actions began in June and officially ended on 31 August. But LAB civil policy adviser Anne Grosskurth said the board would still welcome responses up until the end of next week.

  • In brief: Jail for solicitor who lied for boyfriend

    12-Sep-1997

    Crown Prosecutor Penelope Schofield was jailed for three months at the Old Bailey on Friday for lying in order to protect her policeman boyfriend Nigel Phillips after he was caught drink driving. Schofield had been found guilty of committing an act "tending and intended to pervert the course of justice". Phillips was jailed for 16 months after admitting to the same offence as Schofield.

  • In brief: Lawyers need to catch up on exercise

    12-Sep-1997

    Lawyers are lagging behind in the fitness stakes, according to a Business Pages survey, which found that many firms do not have on-site gyms or subsidised fitness schemes, while only 28 per cent of staff use facilities when they are available.

  • In brief: New department head at Nabarros

    9-Sep-1997

    Nabarro Nathanson partner David Wightman has been appointed head of the firm's banking, tax, environment, intellectual property and information technology department. Wightman joined the City firm when it merged with Turner Kenneth Brown two years ago. He will replace Peter Gorty as head of the department. Gorty is to retire in 1998 but will remain a consultant with the firm.

  • In brief: Official Referee's Courts revamp protocol

    9-Sep-1997

    Solicitors working in Official Referee's Courts have established a new protocol to improve their working relationship with expert witnesses. The Official Referee's Solicitors Association, whose 170 members take construction and highly technical cases to the Official Referee's Courts, said that there have been misunderstandings with expert witnesses over issues such as fees and their courtroom responsibilities.

  • In brief: OSS to probe lawyer's 'silly cow' comment

    12-Sep-1997

    Arnold Rosen, a London solicitor who allegedly told a client that a clerk at a Weston-super-Mare Magistrates' Court was a "silly cow", is being investigated by the Office for the Supervision of Solicitors after he was reported by a policeman who overheard his comment.

  • In brief: Soundings appointment system criticised

    12-Sep-1997

    Lawyers called for the end of the "soundings" system of appointing judges and silks at the Minority Lawyers conference, held at the Law Society's Chancery Lane headquarters in London on 29 November. At the event, Lord Irvine pledged that he would not allow racial discrimination in the appointment of judges.

  • In brief: Survey reveals £40m recruitment bonanza

    9-Sep-1997

    An estimated £40m in commission has been paid by law firms to recruitment agencies over the last 12 months, according to a new survey of the leading 500 law firms. Market research company Winmark used its findings to rate Zarak Macrae Brenner as the top recruitment agency and KPMG Executive as the top search and selection agency.

  • In brief: Titmuss Sainer loses pensions head

    12-Sep-1997

    Richards Butler has poached Titmuss Sainer Dechert's head of pensions Jenny Lewis for its own pensions group.

  • Independent 'visitor' to monitor OSS

    12-Sep-1997

    Solicitors unhappy about the way complaints against them have been handled are set to get an independent "visitor" to whom they can appeal.The idea for an adjudicator to oversee the work of the Office for the Supervision of Solicitors (OSS) has won the support of the Law Society's policy committee.And the society's ruling council is expected to approve the setting up of a working party to look at ways of funding the scheme when it meets this Thursday.

  • Insurer challenges court order

    12-Sep-1997

    London insurance firm Crowley Colosso is waiting to hear whether its appeal against a High Court negligence finding has succeeded. In 1992, Hurricane Andrew tore through the Bahamas causing extensive damage to a US$16m leisure development by American Paul Tudor Jones II. When insurance claims were made, only Sun Alliance, the lead underwriter, agreed to pay, leaving 80 per cent of the claim unmet. Now Crowley Colosso, which placed the insurance, is ...

  • Insurers give Irvine grudging support

    12-Sep-1997

    Lord Irvine has won a private assurance from the insurance industry that it will be able to underpin his legal aid reforms with affordable conditional fee insurance premiums.But despite the assurance, made at a meeting between the Lord Chancellor and leading insurers last week, many insurers still hold private reservations about Lord Irvine's reforms - especially his ability to get them up and running by 1 April next year.Lord Irvine is due to lead a debate ...

  • International lawyers' group to act against MDP threat

    9-Sep-1997

    The 4,000-strong Union Internationale des Avocats (UIA) has come out strongly against the movement of accountants into legal practice, with one senior figure claiming the threat they posed to legal independence was "unacceptable".Guus Braakman, the director of the UIA's legal projects who chaired a special session on the threat of multidisciplinary practices (MDPs) at the 70th anniversary UIA congress in Philadelphia last week, said his organisation was looking to set ...

  • Intuition:a poor substitute for empirical evidence

    12-Sep-1997

    There is too little economics in English commercial law, says Professor Roy Goode. He blames the narrowness of law courses and the short-termism of law makersLegal systems round the world vary significantly in their approach to the role of the courts and to judicial reasoning.In some jurisdictions the emphasis is on formal reasoning. Solutions to legal problems are found through the application of existing legal concepts and doctrines rather than by reference ...

  • IT directors win 25% pay hike

    12-Sep-1997

    At least two City law firm IT directors have won pay rises of nearly 25 per cent as the skills shortage continues.IT directors have been able to negotiate sharp pay rises thanks to a stampede of poachings by rival firms and opportunities in investment banks and the commercial sector.Quarry Dougall managing director, technology, Paul Young said he knew of two instances where IT directors at 50 top City firms had increased their salaries by £15,000 ...

  • LAB comes under fire for 'divide and rule' tactics

    12-Sep-1997

    The group of criminal firms which is bypassing the Law Society to negotiate directly with the Legal Aid Board (LAB) has attacked the board's "divide and rule" tactics over block contracts.Fisher Meredith partner Stephen Hewitt, one of four lawyers chosen by the firms last week to conduct negotiations with the LAB on the criminal block-contracting pilot, said that the board was "silly" to refuse to reveal the names of practices which had expressed interest in the pilot.

  • LAPG mounts poll to test impact of Irvine reforms

    12-Sep-1997

    THE Legal Aid Practitioners Group (LAPG) is to survey all its 600 member firms to gauge the impact the reduction of legal aid will have on their practices.The LAPG executive committee decided at a meeting last week to send out a short survey asking whether practices would be able to expand or would be forced to decrease their business if the Lord Chancellor, Lord Irvine's plans to replace legal aid with conditional fees in many areas came into force.The ...

  • Latham & Watkins opens in Singapore

    12-Sep-1997

    Los Angeles firm Latham & Watkins is launching its new Singapore office on 16 December.Joseph Bevash, a partner in the firm's Hong Kong office, is moving to Singapore to head up the office and will be joined by three to five other lawyers, all working initially in the project finance area.Joseph Blum, head of the firm's London office, said: "We have a lot of ...

  • Law Soc rubbishes Bar Council legal aid paper

    9-Sep-1997

    A Bar Council consultation paper calling for a Contingency Legal Aid Fund has been rubbished by the Law Society which says it does nothing to bring the debate forward.The Bar has produced a consultation paper inviting the Government to undertake a fully-costed feasibility study of a self-financing Contingency Legal Aid Fund.Under the plan, applicants requiring financial support for legal costs would receive their fees from the fund in return for a fixed payment ...

  • Lawyers get help in handling aggression

    9-Sep-1997

    Local government lawyers are to receive training on how to deal with difficult people following complaints by solicitors of widespread aggression against them by both the public and work colleagues.The courses are to be run by the Law Society Local Government Group (LGG) in response to the requests of more than 20 solicitors attending existing training courses being run by the group.LGG training director Peter Godber said local government solicitors were sick ...

  • Lawyers, heal yourselves

    9-Sep-1997

    With SIF premiums rising solicitors must examine their contracts, says Sarah Ahmed. Sarah Ahmed is a partner at Anthony Gold Lerman Muirhead.All practising solicitors should be familiar with the basic steps which lead to the conclusion of a contract: offer and acceptance and its various permutations. However, judging by a number of claims against solicitors for negligence, in which my firm has recently obtained substantial compensation for clients, some solicitors do not ...

  • Leading New Zealand judge questions QC title tradition

    9-Sep-1997

    LEADING niche IT sole practitioner Arnold Segal has joined Theodore Goddard to take up the new post of head of its IT law practice.At the City firm, Segal will head a cross-departmental team of 17 solicitors made up of IP, corporate, competition and entertainment specialists.Segal set up his own practice in 1986 and acted in the field of information technology law for clients in the UK and abroad.He said he decided to join Theodore Goddard because ...

  • Leading New Zeland judge questions QC title tradition

    9-Sep-1997

    Senior New Zealand barristers may be stripped of their Queen's Counsel title following a call for a change to the long-held tradition by the nation's leading judge.Chief Justice Sir Thomas Eichelbaum has suggested it may be time for the QC title to be renamed or completely abolished."Some will argue that extinction is preferable to tinkering, a point of view which certainly deserves consideration," he told the New Zealand media.Although ...

  • Leaked info case rejected

    12-Sep-1997

    The Law Lords have refused leave for an appeal in Propend Finance Pty & ors v Sing & anor. The appeal moves by Australian company Propend followed failure in the High Court and the Court of Appeal to bring contempt proceedings over the release of confidential information which it claims was obtained from documents originally seized under search warrants later held by the High Court to be unlawful.

  • Legal office exhibition heads for Manchester

    9-Sep-1997

    Due to the increasing appetite of northern practices for IT, an exhibition specifically geared towards law firms will be launched in Manchester this autumn.More than 60 exhibitors will take a stand at the Northern Legal Office Exhibition, organised by the same company which stages the annual Solex show.The show, which is sponsored by The Lawyer, will take place at Manchester's GMEX Centre on 21-22 October and will cater for firms of all ...

  • Linklaters' Thai office thrown into doubt

    9-Sep-1997

    Linklaters & Paines is planning to open an office in Thailand - but the move has been jeopardised by the economic crisis in the country.Linklaters managing partner Terence Kyle said his firm had been looking at an office in Thailand for quite some time but was now deciding whether it would still be viable."Obviously the upsets in the market have led to our plans being reviewed," ...

  • Litigation Disciplinary Tribunals 9/12/97

    12-Sep-1997

    Christopher Jackson, 43, admitted 1987, practising at material time as Simon Jackson and Co, Taunton, struck off and ordered to pay £778 costs. Allegations substantiated that he had been convicted of offences of indecent assault. Tribunal recognised that offences were in no way connected with his position as a solicitor and that they were not of the most serious type. However, it said he had indecently assaulted female children while teaching them ...

  • Litigation Disciplinary Tribunals 9/9/97

    9-Sep-1997

    Michael Peter Seward, 40, admitted 1982 and Anthony David Lea, admitted 1979, practising at material times as Michael Seward and Co, Warrington and St Helens, respectively fined £3,000 and ordered to pay £3,049 costs, and £500 with a £1,000 costs order. Allegations substantiated that Seaward wrongly drew and used client account money for his own purposes. Allegation substantiated Lea wrongly drew client money. ...

  • Litigation Personal Injury 9/12/97

    12-Sep-1997

    Carter v Bath District Health Authority - QBD 6 November, 1997Claimant: Kylie Carter, Incident: Medical negligenceInjuries: Claimant suffered oxygen starvation during birth at Royal United Hospital, Bath in September 1988 and was rendered quadriplegic. She is now wholly dependent on others and her injuries are regarded as being of "the severest sort". She suffers abnormal muscle tone and dystonic spasms affect her whole body. She is also ...

  • Litigation Personal Injury 9/9/97

    9-Sep-1997

    Povey v South Birmingham Health Authority - QBD 25 July 1997Claimant: Stephen Povey, 49Incident: Medical negligenceInjuries: Claim by widower and two teenage children of 40-year-old woman who died undergoing an operation following the discovery of an aneurysm in main artery at base of skull. Held that consultant neurosurgeon was guilty of negligence in allowing less experienced colleague to carry out craniotomy operation on his late wife. During ...

  • Litigation Recent Decisions 9/12/97

    12-Sep-1997

    Injunctions against dealers in Internet domain namesMarks & Spencer v (1) One in a Million (2) Richard Conway (3) Julian Nicholson (4) Global Media Communications (5) Junic; Ladbrokes v same; J Sainsbury v same; Virgin Enterprises v same; British Telecommunications & Telecom Securicor Cellular Radio v same (1997)Court: Ch D (Jonathan Sumption QC) 28/11/97The court was considering applications for summary judgment in five actions, in each of which ...

  • Litigation Recent Decisions 9/12/97

    12-Sep-1997

    Jeweller Shahid Bashir, whose business collapsed after an armed robbery, is suing his insurer for compensation. Bashir, who traded in gold jewellery from a shop at Stoke Poges, Buckinghamshire, has issued a writ against Moore Brown Barnes, London E1. According to his writ, the robbery took place on 1 March last year when he was out of the country. It claims that he had left his father looking after his property but that three armed men broke into his ...

  • Litigation Recent Decisions 9/9/97

    9-Sep-1997

    Couple appeal against disqualification as directorsSecretary of State for Trade and Industry v (1) Trevor Paul Ivens (2) Jane Hilary Ivens (1997)Court: CA (Leggatt LJ, Morritt LJ and Brooke LJ) 25/7/9Summary: Challenge by respondent directors to applications for disqualification orders against them as to the extent that misconduct as directors in other companies can be taken into account when the charge is of misconduct in a lead company.

  • Litigation Writs 9/9/97

    9-Sep-1997

    The West Bromwich Building Society is suing 26 firms from all over the country over advice given to borrowers which it claims has now rendered it vulnerable to actions brought by borrowers. The building society's claim concerns information and advice given by the firms, and their failure to give adequate information and advice to borrowers over equity release mortgages. The writ alleges that because of their negligence, negligent misstatement, misrepresentation and ...

  • Lloyd's scores victory over US Names in fraud battle

    9-Sep-1997

    Lloyd's of London, represented by US firm Fried Frank Harris Shriver & Jacobson, has won two significant victories in its battle with rebel US Names who are determined to sue the London re-insurance market for fraud in the US.The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco - which previously had been the only appeals court to support litigating Names on this issue - has decided to rehear its earlier decision.A panel of three judges originally ruled by ...

  • Lord Irvine to bolster relationship with UK

    9-Sep-1997

    The Lord Chancellor, Lord Irvine of Lairg QC, will become the first cabinet minister to visit the region since the transfer of sovereignty on 1 July when he visits the former colony this week.Irvine has indicated that the main purpose of his visit is to bolster the relationship between the judicial systems of Hong Kong and the UK.He is said to be "determined" to do everything he can to ensure that Britain's close historic links with the Hong Kong judiciary ...

  • Lord Irvine:flying too close the sun?

    12-Sep-1997

    The comparison Lord Irvine made last week between himself and Cardinal Wolsey caused many in the legal profession to cringe.Power crazed, some said. A rather severe case of egomania, said others. However, at a time when the legal profession is most concerned about the imminent privatisation of legal aid, most put it down to lack of judgement. Particularly as it followed shortly after his "wallpaper" debacle.Lord Irvine has since ...

  • Making his mark

    9-Sep-1997

    With one of the largest Scottish firms becoming a de facto multidisciplinary (MDP) practice by joining Arthur Andersen's global network, and legal aid lawyers vociferous about the proposed public defenders pilot scheme, the new president of the Law Society of Scotland has hit the ground running.Unusually for a law society president, John Elliot, of Edinburgh firm Lindsays WS, is based ...

  • Mergers, money and machiavellian plots

    12-Sep-1997

    What a difference a year makes. Fat City fees, crisis at Chancery Lane, warnings that the Bar's days are numbered and reform of the legal aid system. Chris Fogarty looks back on a legal year that packed plenty of punch.The 1997 legal year has been bound together by three threads - mergers, money and machiavellian plots.At the beginning of the year it was the merger of City firms McKenna & Co and Cameron Markby Hewitt that captured the attention of lawyers ...

  • New Covent Garden row

    9-Sep-1997

    The owners of London's New Covent Garden complex are heading for the High Court in a battle over possession of land at the site. Covent Garden Market Authority is suing supermarket chain Sainsbury's, claiming that it wrongfully entered into possession of the land and put equipment on it. It will argue when the case reaches court that a reasonable fee for the use and enjoyment of the site would be £20,000 a year.

  • Northern Ireland's first PFI scuppered

    9-Sep-1997

    Nothern Ireland's first PFI project to build a complete hospital has been scuppered by the NHS trust which initiated it.A consortium advised by Belfast firm Elliott Duffy Garrett expected the Down Lisburn NHS Trust to name its preferred bidder for a PFI scheme to build a new £13m Downe Hospital last week.Instead the trust, advised by Lovell White Durrant and Belfast firm L'Estrange & Brett, wrote to say that the consortium's proposals did ...

  • Norton Rose's competition head defects to Macfarlanes

    9-Sep-1997

    Medium-sized City firm Macfarlanes has poached Norton Rose's respected departmental head John Cook to build up its competition department.Cook, a leader in his field who founded Norton Rose's competition department nine years ago and built it up to four partners and 12 assistants in London and ...

  • Olswang fee income up by 40 per cent

    9-Sep-1997

    Olswang has reported a 40 per cent growth in fee income for the past financial year, making it second only to Garretts of all the law firms that have reported growth rates this year.This is the first time the 16-year-old firm has reported fee income growth. Olswang marketing director Kim Tasso said that the high figure was the reason. However, she added, "We would hope to have a figure that ...

  • Oswald's Osborne joins Gray's Inn firm

    9-Sep-1997

    Former Oswald Hickson Collier insurance litigation partner Richard Osborne has joined Gray's Inn Road-based insurance litigation practice Edward Lewis. Osborne, who acted on behalf of managing and members' agents in the recent Lloyd's litigation, was one of two insurance partners at Oswalds who did not participate in the firm's merger with libel practice Crockers in May. The other, Miles Tomkins, has taken a break and is now believed to be looking for a new position.

  • Paris call for global privacy law

    9-Sep-1997

    THE PARIS Bar has called for the introduction of a global privacy law in the aftermath of the death of Diana, Princess of Wales, and Dodi Fayed.And, as The Lawyer went to press, the largely French-speaking international lawyers group, the Union Internationale des Avocats (UIA), looked set to lend its weight to the Paris Bar's demands by adopting a resolution calling for international privacy regulations.The move is set to pit the UIA against the International ...

  • Policing cyberspace

    12-Sep-1997

    Can the rules and regulations of the 'real' world be applied to activity on the Internet? Dr Satvinder Juss confronts the challenges of pornography on the Web.Nineteenth century American essayist Oliver Wendell Holmes once said: "The best test of truth is the power of the thought to get itself accepted in the competition of the market." The market today is becoming ever more complex, extending beyond simple telecommunications to embrace the newly ...

  • Property

    12-Sep-1997

    Fladgate Fielder advised the government of the province of British Columbia on the granting of a lease on part of British Columbia House, Regent Street, London, to the British Tourist Authority for a term of 15 years. The British Tourist Authority was advised by Ashurst Morris Crisp.

  • Property

    9-Sep-1997

    SJ Berwin acted for a new joint venture company between British Land and The Rank Group which will purchase and leaseback 14 bingo clubs and 10 cinema/leisure complexes to Rank at open market value. Richards Butler acted for The Rank Group.

  • Property

    9-Sep-1997

    Druces & Attlee advised Australian Mutual Provident Society and The Equitable Life Assurance Society on their sale of an office block at Centre City, Birmingham, to GE Capital and Portfolio Holdings, advised by Nabarro Nathanson.

  • PSC gets back on course for '98

    9-Sep-1997

    Alan Pannett explains how the Law Society has overhauled the Professional Skills Course which is to take effect next yearThe Professional Skills Course (PSC) is and has always been disliked. Trainees do not like it because it is imposed on them at a time when they thought they had finished with exams on the Legal Practice Course (LPC). Training directors do not like it because parts of the course are seen as irrelevant or at least as belonging to the LPC and as such taking ...

  • Race case 'shame' for faculty

    12-Sep-1997

    Manchester University's law faculty will have to pay the highest ever damages for racial discrimination in a case described by an industrial tribunal as "a matter of sadness and shame" for the faculty.On 13 November, Birmingham Industrial Tribunal ordered the faculty to pay £43,560 to lecturer Dr Asif Qureshi after upholding a string of racial discrimination claims made by him against the university this summer.The former dean, Professor Rodney Brazier, ...

  • Racial attacks by tenants put Lancaster Council in the dock

    12-Sep-1997

    Bibi Berki reportsIf local authorities can be held responsible in the civil courts for the wrong-doing of its tenants, can that blame be extended to cover criminal acts as well?Lancaster City Council is being sued for negligence by two of its tenants for allegedly failing to prevent a string of racially-motivated attacks against them.Mixed race couple Mal Hussein and Linda Livingstone own a corner shop on the city's Ryelands estate.

  • Reheabilitation Act fails teacher

    12-Sep-1997

    Roger Pearson looks at how a teacher's job prospects have been jeopardised by an old conviction that has come back to haunt himA loophole in the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 has been exposed by a recent High Court action. It is one which undermines the spirit of the Act and could result in one-time offenders being penalised when applying for jobs or travel visas long after their past misdemeanours are officially considered "spent" convictions.

  • Riggs' Paris role

    12-Sep-1997

    John Riggs, a partner at the Paris office of White & Case, has become the second non-French lawyer to sit on the governing council of the Paris Bar. Riggs will take up his office at the start of next year for a three-year term.

  • Russell Jones faces negligence writ from disaster survivors

    12-Sep-1997

    PERSONAL injury firm Russell Jones & Walker is being sued for negligence and breach of contract by four survivors of a cruise ship disaster.The survivors of the Jupiter cruise ship disaster, which occurred off the coast of Piraeus in Greece in October 1988, have each been granted legal aid to sue Russell Jones. The claimants, who were among 400 British schoolchildren forced to jump from the boat when it was rammed by a freighter, are claiming up to £30,000 each in ...

  • Scottish conveyancing system for whom?

    9-Sep-1997

    Leslie Dubow highlights some of the flaws of the Scottish conveyancing system that the Adam Smith Institute has recommended and offers some alternative solutions. Leslie Dubow is executive officer of the SPG.A report of the Adam Smith Institute on the house-selling process is said to recommend adopting the Scottish legal process whereby buyers and sellers enter into a binding contract at an earlier stage than they do in England and Wales.While the introduction ...

  • Secret report calls for Sif carve-up

    12-Sep-1997

    The troubled Solicitors Indemnity Fund (SIF) is to be scrapped in favour of six, separate, compulsory mutual funds covering specialist practice areas, under proposals to be unveiled by the Law Society next year.The Appleby Committee, headed by Law Society Council member John Appleby, has spent a year examining how to revamp SIF and will recommend a multi-fund scheme when it releases its report ...

  • Seven from Mishcons attend funeral

    9-Sep-1997

    SEVEN Mishcon de Reya staff were invited to attend Princess Diana's funeral on Saturday.Senior partner Anthony Julius and Maggie Rae, who is head of the family department, were among those asked to represent the firm, which has acted for the Princess during the last three-and-a-half years, at the Westminster Abbey tribute.Mishcon de Reya spokeswoman Kate Day, speaking ...

  • Smart card technology springs a leak

    12-Sep-1997

    A new method of paying for water services is being blamed for an increasing number of disconnections, reports Roger PearsonThe future of an electronic "smart card" method of payment for water services hangs in the balance as the High Court ponders its legality.Six local authorities - Manchester, Liverpool and Birmingham city councils, and Lancashire County Council and Tameside and Oldham metropolitan borough councils - have lined up against ...

  • Solicitor challenges police

    9-Sep-1997

    A pending appeal could produce a flood of litigation against doctors who allegedly prescribe the wrong drugs, reports Roger Pearson.The Law Lords are to consider the case of a solicitor who claims she was wrongfully arrested by police. Solicitor Georgina Lois Smith, has won leave to appeal against her failed claim against Wiltshire Police. In 1988, she acted for a man accused of threatening the life of the father of a girl with whom he had been involved. He ...

  • Tartan tacks

    9-Sep-1997

    With long-established Edinburgh firm Dundas & Wilson CS leaping into bed with the Arthur Andersen network (and Dorman Jeffrey & Co being enfolded into Dundas & Wilson), according to one senior partner of another Scottish firm, there is only one topic of conversation on the golf courses north of the border. The unnamed client is speaking for many when he says: "Andersens are my accountants, but ...

  • The case for fairer sentencing

    9-Sep-1997

    Roger Pearson looks at two recent appeals which have highlighted the need for more guidance on sentencing in contempt cases.Two recent Court of Appeal decisions serve as a signpost warning to courts throughout the country not to impose excessive sentences for contempt of orders in matrimonial cases, even if the contempt involves physical violence.One appeal involved a husband who, in a jealous rage, dragged his estranged wife from a car and punched ...

  • The law firm of the millennium: a vision...

    12-Sep-1997

    The Lawyer asked computer industry specialist Bill Cannings to give us his predictions of how firms will adopt legal technology by the next millennium. Cannings, managing director of Valid Information Systems, forecasts:the cost of case management and accounting systems will plummet when firms realise that they can purchase home-produced products at a fraction of the price of US systems;offices will not have become paperless;

  • The Lawyer Inquiry: Ann Marsh

    12-Sep-1997

    Ann Marsh was born in Sussex on 22 January 1965. She is a solicitor at Manches & Co.What was your first job?Making potentiometers in an electronic components factory.What was your first ever salary as a lawyer?£12,500pa.What would you have done if you hadn't become a lawyer?Become Director of Education in the Sudan.Which law could you live without?

  • The Lawyer Inquiry: Kenneth Ross

    9-Sep-1997

    Kenneth Ross was born in Glasgow on 30 September 1958. He is head of the business law division at Bishop and Robertson Chalmers.What was your first job?Assistant on an archaeological dig.What was your first ever salary as a lawyer?£3,250 per annum.What would you have done if you hadn't become a lawyer?Archaeologist.Which law could you live without?

  • The legal aid scapegoats

    9-Sep-1997

    Solicitors are unfairly blamed for the rising cost of legal aid, says Morag GalbraithThe blame for the rising costs of legal aid in Scotland has routinely been laid at the door of solicitors. In light of the forthcoming provisions of the Crime and Punishment (Scotland) Act, many of which seek to cut the costs of legal aid, we must ensure that the other components of the legal system are considered: the costs of the delay at courts; the non-availability at deferred sentences ...

  • Time for action on the MDPs question

    9-Sep-1997

    The thorny issue of multidisciplinary practices (MDPs) is one which has occupied the legal profession for some years now. But while the philosophical arguments have provided much fodder for debate, the reality is that MDPs are a fact of life, thanks to the proactive approach of the Big Six accountancy firms, most of whom have now built large pan-European law practices.Coopers & Lybrand, for example, is reckoned to have the seventeenth-largest firm ...

  • Top 10 firms sign up to access original company data

    12-Sep-1997

    CITY firms Allen & Overy, Eversheds and Slaughter and May have installed an information service which allows users to access from their desktop exact copies of the original accounts and annual returns of all 1.4 million ...

  • Top French lawyers called up

    9-Sep-1997

    The services of several of France's top lawyers have been called on in the aftermath of the tragedy.Georges Kiejman, who is acting on behalf of Mohamed Al Fayed against the paparazzi, is a high-profile figure in the mould of George Carman QC.Kiejman, former French Justice Minister, acted for the Mitterrand family when it unsuccessfully sued Paris Match for running pictures of President Mitterrand lying dead in his room at the Elysee Palace.Kiejman ...

  • UK Sidley & Austin office bags Travers Smith partner

    9-Sep-1997

    US firm Sidley & Austin is moving into UK corporate finance work with the poaching of Travers Smith Braithwaite partner Mark Pinder for its London office.Pinder, who said he had arranged to leave before Travers Smith was hit by its involvement in Andrew Regan's failed bid for the Co-op, will be Sidley & Austin's first corporate finance partner and he will be given the task of ...

  • US firm boosts global profile

    9-Sep-1997

    US firm Jones Day Reavis & Pogue is boosting its international presence by sending two international securities specialists to Sydney and expanding its Frankfurt office.Jones Day Washington partners Kevin Cramer and associate Andrew Reilly will move into space at the Sydney office of Australian firm Corrs Chambers Westgarth - a firm with which Jones Day has had a longstanding relationship.

  • US firm hit by loss of UK-qualified partner

    12-Sep-1997

    In a blow for the London ambitions of US firm Chadbourne & Parke, its sole UK-qualified partner in the capital has defected after only six months.Martin Stewart-Smith, who moved from Ashurst Morris Crisp to Chadbournes in June as a partner in its project finance department, has left the firm to join ...