3 March 1997

The Lawyer

  • 40 head for Israel

    6-Mar-1997

    The 200-member British Israel Law Association is organising a trip to Israel at the end of June. About 40 are expected to go on the four-day visit, which will feature visits to Israeli law firms, business briefings, lectures and a tour of the Supreme Court. For further information, contact Richard Schiffer, of Zellermayer Pelossof & Schiffer, on 0171 629 1920.

  • A problem shared

    6-Mar-1997

    Taking part in a user group not only helps you to get the most out of your practice system but also allows you to share your expertise with others, says Boyd Holmes. Boyd Holmes is managing partner of Cartmell Shepherd in Carlisle and chair of the AIM Computer Users Association (ACUA). Making effective use of computer technology is important to the survival of law firms. Taking an interest in computer technology, rather than having computers in the office just for others to use, is ...

  • Abortion. Women's choice under scrutiny

    6-Mar-1997

    Barbara Hewson believes the weight of law was behind the rights of the woman in the recent case where a husband sought to prevent his estranged wife from having an abortion. Barbara Hewson is a barrister at Littman Chambers, 12 Gray's Inn Square. The recent battle between Lynne Kelly and her estranged husband in the Scottish courts once again shows a pregnant woman's choices being subjected to judicial scrutiny and intervention. This time the pretext was alleged "foetal rights".

  • Adapting to an IT future

    6-Mar-1997

    Douglas Fry takes a look at how the UK's leading firms are developing computing solutions to give them a competitive edge. Douglas Fry is a freelance journalist.The UK's top 10 law firms have researched their it requirements, invested heavily in systems and implemented diverse solutions. These solutions reveal a number of IT trends as well as some unique methods.Microsoft, inevitably, is making inroads, particularly with its Word ...

  • Advice on Asia

    6-Mar-1997

    Ex-Freshfields Bangkok lawyer David Took has set up an independent consultancy for projects in South East Asia. Took, who qualified in Australia, is still working for Freshfields on privatisation and infrastructure projects. The Australian-qualified lawyer is looking to attract business from law firms and corporate counsel in all types of infrastructure projects.

  • Arbitration. Solving disputes the arbitration way

    6-Mar-1997

    Procedural improvements in the Arbitration Act mean it is better than ever to use London, reports Stewart Shackleton. Stewart Shackleton is senior associate of the arbitration group at Norton Rose in London and Paris. There has been much discussion at various academic conferences on the subject of the new Arbitration Act which came into force on 31 January this year.Learned authorities ...

  • Bar to launch cable network

    6-Mar-1997

    A cable telecommunications system for barristers is due to be launched in July.The planned network is the result of long negotiations between the Bar Council and several suppliers.The system, which can be used for ordinary phone calls, will also handle video-conferencing and other online services as they become available, such as court listings and Internet access.The network has been piloted by 40 chambers in London, Birmingham and Southampton since ...

  • Crest shows its value

    6-Mar-1997

    Members of the Association of solicitor Investment Managers are making the most out of the new electronic share dealing system, says Andrew Murray. Andrew Murray is head of the financial services unit at Lawrence Graham. The transfer to Crest - the Stock Exchange's electronic share dealing system - over the past few months has been a difficult and time-consuming process for the financial ...

  • Defeating the fraudsters

    6-Mar-1997

    Thanks to the Serious Fraud Office, corrupt shipping tycoon Abbas Gokal will spend until at least 2001 in prison for his part in defrauding Bank of Credit and Commerce International customers of their life savings. But those of us charged with the job of trying to catch fraudsters need to learn our lessons a lot faster.The 14-year sentence Gokal received for his part in the $13bn BCCI scandal is the longest ever imposed in an SFO prosecution. As chairman of the Gulf shipping ...

  • Devolution opportunity for lawyers

    6-Mar-1997

    A DEVON firm has introduced uniforms for all female staff apart from legal executives and solicitors.Peter Reade, the managing partner at Kitsons, in Newton Abbot, said the uniforms were introduced for secretaries and support staff because "banks and building societies have found that the public prefer the person from whom they are seeking advice to be wearing a suit".A similar policy would not be introduced for men because "they all dress in suits and ties and ...

  • Devolution opportunity for lawyers

    6-Mar-1997

    Scottish lawyers would have a greater say in the law-making process in a devolved parliament, according to newly-elected Law Society of Scotland president John Elliot.The Edinburgh solicitor said a Scottish legislature would boost the influence of the country's law society "simply because the Westminster legislature has given us very little time".He said the Scottish legal profession had long been frustrated by laws formulated in London that caused problems ...

  • Eagle Star looks in-house to cut legal bills up North

    6-Mar-1997

    Insurance giant Eagle Star is considering opening an in-house insurance litigation team in Manchester to cut its legal bills in the north west.The company, which is a major supplier of legal work to firms in the region, says the move has been prompted by concerns over its "claims and litigation costs" in the area.The company announced that it was only considering the move in Manchester and was not opening a national department. It denied rumours that it had already ...

  • Enterprise Chambers heads north

    6-Mar-1997

    The countdown to the legal challenge has begun. Any law firm or barristers' chambers which is brimming over with brilliance, ingenuity and a sense of humour (fitness would also help) is invited to enlist in the ultimate team-building exercise this month. The Teampower Legal Challenge is organised by leadership development company Whynot in association with The Lawyer. Since 1990, it has raised more than £100,000 for Crisis, the charity for the homeless. For more details of ...

  • FDA fights redundancies threat

    6-Mar-1997

    THE CROWN Prosecution Service and the The Association of First Division Civil Servants (FDA) are at loggerheads over claims by the lawyers' union that senior prosecutors are for the first time facing compulsory redundancies.Last week, the FDA's CPS convenor Kevin Goodwin told The Lawyer that senior management had "made it known" that they were considering compulsory redundancies for senior prosecutors in the central casework section, which handles the most complex ...

  • Female support staff at Devon firm given uniform treatment

    6-Mar-1997

    Lovell White Durrant is on the hunt for a new London home after an unsuccessful bid for the Mirror Group newspapers building.Lovells moved into its existing offices at 65 Holborn Viaduct in 1990. The lease runs out at the turn of the century and Lovells is looking to move.Property partner Simon MacDonagh, who is co-ordinating the search for new premises, said the firm had an open mind as to where it went but would like to be on the fringes of the City.

  • Financing

    6-Mar-1997

    Bevan Ashford is advising Newbury College on its plans to build a 9

  • Financing

    6-Mar-1997

    Ashurst Morris Crisp acted for Autolink Concessionaires (M6)

  • Firms welcome PFI initiatives

    6-Mar-1997

    Firms involved in Private Finance Initiative (PFI) projects have welcomed a succession of moves by the new Government to kickstart PFI, saying they are reassured by the speed with which Labour has acted.Since coming into power, the Government has announced a review of PFI, introduced a Bill to clarify the position of NHS trusts and PFI, and abolished universal PFI testing.The review, to be carried out by private sector businessman Malcolm Bates, chair of Pearl ...

  • For the good of the law

    6-Mar-1997

    This week the question of whether or not the compulsory minimum salary for trainees remains will be debated by the Law Society's council.It is an issue which the profession should take a positive interest in and support trainees, otherwise it will find itself in the position that only those who can afford to subsidise their income will be able to practice law.I know that some partners in my firm would certainly not pay trainees anything like a decent ...

  • Forging new links

    6-Mar-1997

    A new association for UK and Argentinian lawyers is to be launched at the Law Society later this month to help forge links between the two countries. Law Society president Tony Girling and the Argentinian ambassador, Rogelio Pfirter, will attend the group's launch at the Law Society's Hall on 16 June. Argentinian lawyer Alexandra Sadler, of Hampshire firm Blake Lapthorn, is the driving ...

  • Former Law Soc president backs Task Force plans

    6-Mar-1997

    FORMER Law Society president Martin Mears has pledged his support to plans mooted by lobby group Task Force to prevent firms suing employees for negligence.The Law Society's standards and guidance committee is to examine the issue when it meets next month.Mears wants firms to disclose, at interview, whether or not they will sue. He also wants firms to be prevented from suing unless there are exceptional circumstances.Exceptional circumstances ...

  • Handling of Irish libel cases comes under fire

    6-Mar-1997

    News International head of legal Tom Chrone last week lambasted the Irish legal system's handling of defamation claims, particularly the way in which barristers are used.At a seminar - 'Defamation Actions in Ireland: Points and Pitfalls' - organised by Dublin firm McCann Fitzgerald, he criticised the dependency on barristers during settlement talks. In particular he hit out at the accepted practice of using two senior counsels plus a junior for the simplest ...

  • IBA plans to present UN with draft genetics treaty

    6-Mar-1997

    A TREATY to prevent the misuse of genetic information is to be presented to United Nations secretary general Kofi Annan this month in New York when he opens the International Bar Association's 50th anniversary celebrations.Annan and Al Gore, the US vice-president, are the keynote speakers at the three-day celebrations being held at the UN's headquarters.The draft treaty, drawn up by the IBA's medicine and law committee and approved at the association's ...

  • In brief: A&O New York recruits capital markets ace

    6-Mar-1997

    Allen & Overy's latest recruit is a US lawyer who will work in the firm's New York office, one of its 15 international offices. Cathleen McLaughlin, an international capital markets specialist, is due to join the team of more than 30 US-qualified lawyers on June 2. McLaughlin previously worked as an associate at S

  • In brief: Ex-Cornish & Co lawyer joins Withers

    6-Mar-1997

    Banking specialist David Dannreuther, formerly of MW Cornish & Co, has joined City firm Withers as a partner. Head of Withers' banking team, David Mills, said: "David's arrival is another demonstration of the firm's long-term commitment to its corporate and banking work, which has doubled in the past two years." MW Cornish & Co has broken up following leading commodities lawyer Martin Cornish's ...

  • In brief: Extra work on cards for council lawyers

    6-Mar-1997

    Local government lawyers could face an extra workload if the Labour government gives local authorities the go-ahead to raise private sector finance for housing. Deputy Prime Minister John Prescott has indicated that he is keen to allow councils to borrow privately, as housing associations already do, although this has yet to emerge as official Government policy. Liverpool City Council's senior housing lawyer Jo Miller said if Prescott's plan got the green light it would have ...

  • In brief: Firm loses second partner to Denton Hall

    6-Mar-1997

    City firm Watson Farley & Williams has lost its second partner this year to the banking and finance markets group at Denton Hall. Neil Cuthbert, a partner with Watsons who was with the firm for 12 years, joins leading banking lawyer Geoffrey Wynne, who moved to Denton Hall at the beginning of the year. Cuthbert worked at the Royal Bank of Canada, where Wynne was assistant general counsel. ...

  • In brief: McGrigor Donald woos Boyd for public dept

    6-Mar-1997

    Former Scottish Law Society president Alan Boyd has been recruited as public sector director of Glasgow firm McGrigor Donald. President of the society in 1995, Boyd was head of legal services at the Irvine Development Corporation until it was wound-up in March. McGrigor Donald said it was looking to expand its public sector work and managing partner Niall Scott said that Boyd's 20 years of experience in this field made him a ideal candidate for the job.

  • In brief: Nottingham firm attracts Eversheds pair

    6-Mar-1997

    Nottingham law firm Freeth Cartwright Hunt Dickins has poached two intellectual property lawyers from rival firm Eversheds' office. Helen Driscoll joins the practice as an associate partner and Martin West joins as an assistant. Driscoll says Freeth Cartwright Hunt Dickens sees IP "as a potential growth area". It now has six lawyers in its IP team.

  • In brief: Take The Lawyer's legal Challenge

    6-Mar-1997

    Commercial chancery set Enterprise Chambers has opened an annexe in Newcastle to take advantage of a flurry of legal activity in the city.Its move comes as sources say there is now a greater than 50-50 chance that Eversheds and Newcastle firm Wilkinson Maughan will merge.Head of chambers Anthony Mann QC said the set was following several national solicitors firms into the Tyneside ...

  • Islington claims victory in rate swaps challenge

    6-Mar-1997

    Islington Borough Council has fended off a £700,000 interest swap claim from Welwyn Hatfield District Council in the Court of Appeal.The action resulted from an interest rate swap the two councils embarked on in 1987.Such swaps, involving complicated speculation on interest rates, were ruled outside local authorities powers by the High Court in the early 1990s.According to Islington, Welwyn Hatfield was simply trying to reopen ...

  • LAG rejects Home Office proposals as "unworkable"

    6-Mar-1997

    HOME office proposals to ensure that guilty pleas are prosecuted within 24 hours are "wrong in principle" and "unworkable in practice", according to the Legal Action Group.The attack is contained in the highly critical LAG response to the Narey Report, which was commissioned by the former Home Secretary, Michael Howard, before the General Election to come up with suggestions to speed up justice.The report, which was presented to Parliament in February, contains ...

  • Law Soc damned by members

    6-Mar-1997

    The Law Society is unfriendly, unhelpful, poor at promoting and representing the profession and does not listen to its members' views enough, according to a survey of solicitors from various areas of practice.The survey of 1,120 solicitors in private practice, local and central government, and commerce and industry, was carried out for the Law Society by IFF Research in January this year.The damning results revealed that only 8 per cent of solicitors in ...

  • Law Soc needs to justify its existence

    6-Mar-1997

    Solicitors have once again given the Law Society the thumbs-down. In a damning indictment, a survey of its members accuses the society of unhelpfulness, poor treatment of its members and of paying too little attention to the views and problems of the profession. It also gives its governing body nuls points for its promotion of the profession to the public at large.The Law Society is prone to blaming the malaise on poor communication with its members. When nearly ...

  • Law Soc to stand firm on Green Form boycott

    6-Mar-1997

    THE Law Society looks set to renew its call for law firms to boycott the Legal Aid Board's green form block contract pilot, when it reviews the decision at Thursday's council meeting.Since the Law Society announced the boycott in April, protracted negotiations have been taking place between the LAB and the society over the pilot. The society claims the pilot will leave firms out of pocket because of its "complicated and elaborate administrative systems".

  • Law Society ducks the salary issue

    6-Mar-1997

    The future of the compulsory minimum salary for trainee solicitors hangs by a thread. On Thursday, the Law Society council will debate the issue and decide whether or not to endorse the Training Committee's recommendation that the 15-year-old minimum salary be retained.This is one of the most important matters to come before the council in recent years. The debate raises questions which range beyond the specific issue of trainee salaries to the central issue of ...

  • Lawyers fear proposed Thai law could restrict foreign practices

    6-Mar-1997

    Foreign lawyers in Bangkok have expressed concern at a new draft consultancy paper which, if enacted in legislation, could see foreign practices restricted.The draft was prepared by local lawyer Khun Chavalit, a partner in International Legal Consultants Thailand (ILTC), on behalf of local lawyers.Chavalit was unavailable for comment as The Lawyer went to press, but it is understood the draft recommends barring foreign law consultants from being able to advise ...

  • Liberty conference discusses stalking

    6-Mar-1997

    STALKING legislation and the protection of children were top of the agenda at Liberty's first post-election law and order conference last Saturday.John Wadham, director of Liberty, said the purpose of the London conference was to ensure that justified concerns about crime and the "spat between the two political parties over which was toughest on crime" did not encourage reductions in the rights of suspects.The conference, which took place after The Lawyer ...

  • Litigation Personal Injury 03/06/97

    6-Mar-1997

    Jay v Bexley Health Authority - QBD 21 April 1997Claimant: Lucy Jay, Incident: Medical negligenceInjuries: Award to child whose mother died shortly after her birth. Mother had undergone IVF treatment but health authorities failed to diagnose she had an eptopic pregnancy. Court told that despite "clear warning signs" staff had negligently failed to diagnose the eptopic pregnancy until the final stages of Mrs Jay's pregnancy. Mother died as ...

  • Litigation Recent Decisions 03/06/97

    6-Mar-1997

    Challenge to searches of cells in prisoner's absenceR v The Governor of HM Prison Whitemoor ex parte Ronald Main (1997)DC (Pill LJ, Latham J and Astill J) 16/5/9Appearances: Miss Montgomery QC instructed by the Treasury Solicitor for the respondent.Summary: Challenge to the legality of prison cell searches in the absence of the prisoner based on the protection of the prisoner's right to legal professional privilege considered.

  • Litigation Writs 03/06/97

    6-Mar-1997

    Two sets of neighbours from Much Hadham, Hertfordshire, are heading for a High Court confrontation in a battle over an extension one of them plans to build. Matthew Hughes and Valerie Feuell are seeking court orders to prevent neighbours Rachel Locke and Toby Campbell-Gray from interfering with their plans and allegedly trespassing on their property. Hughes and Feuell are also suing the former owner of the property, Andrew Sargeant, and seeking damages from him for ...

  • Little doubt on Asylum seekers

    6-Mar-1997

    A recent ruling by the Master of the Rolls, Lord Woolf, and two other appeal Court judges leaves little doubt that asylum seekers can no longer regard the UK as a safe haven while their applications for asylum are being considered.Their decision that the former Home Secretary, Michael Howard, could lawfully conclude that France was a safe country to which asylum seekers can be removed, is seen as one with far reaching consequences for a particularly vulnerable group of people.

  • Lucas Bateman on the need for a reform of attitudes.

    6-Mar-1997

    Lucas Bateman is an intellectual property litigator at Pinsent Curtis in Leeds.In an era of concern over the time and money consumed by litigation, I anticipate that the recent trend towards the granting of orders for lump sum costs in the Chancery Division will be welcomed by most practitioners.In a Patents Court Practice Explanation, 1 All ER 383 (1997), the patents judges have all but invited applications for immediate assessment by the trial ...

  • New Government:new CPS

    6-Mar-1997

    The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) is on the eve of yet another major overhaul.On one level, it needs another shake-up like it needs a hole in the head. The review announced last month by the Attorney General, John Morris, will create uncertainty among staff and divert vital time and resources away from the prosecuting front-line.But the reaction to Labour's initiative has been almost universally positive. Almost everybody now believes the service has become ...

  • New toys for the girls and boys

    6-Mar-1997

    Certain tools are now considered essential to efficient and cost-effective business. For example, it is accepted as the norm for every member of staff in a law firm to have their own PC connected to the internal network.While some may debate the effectiveness of fee earners typing their own documents, few would disagree with them making minor amendments to documents that secretaries have typed. Some fee earners prefer to get their words right and get their secretaries ...

  • No win no fee firm launched

    6-Mar-1997

    A no win no fee firm that will operate solely for employees at industrial tribunals is being launched today by a law centre-based employment law specialist.The new firm is believed to be the first exclusively to run actions at industrial tribunals on a contingency fee basis.Lawrence Davies, an employment specialist at North Lambeth Law Centre, who was formerly at City firm McKenna & Co, said the fast turnover of cases (usually between three and six months) and ...

  • Praise for LHCs

    6-Mar-1997

    The benefits of Local Housing Companies (LHCs) still outweigh the alternatives, according to local government specialist Simon Randall. Randall, a partner at Lawrence Graham, said LHCs provide the perfect vehicle to regenerate urban housing under the Labour government's planned £5bn release of unspent cash from homes sold under the right to buy scheme. The Government is ...

  • Prize for ideas

    6-Mar-1997

    Chris Fogarty reportsThe Local Government Group Training Directorate is seeking ideas for training courses. Run by Peter Godber, the directorate offers local government lawyers a wide range of courses but wants to ensure it is not overlooking any area where lawyers feel they need extra training and information. The Local Government Group is offering return flights for two from London to Paris for the lawyer who comes up with the best training idea. Entries should be ...

  • Quantifying the fee issue

    6-Mar-1997

    It is with dismay but no surprise that I learn of the threatened referral by the Office of Fair Trading (OFT) of the Standard Mortgage instructions to the Restrictive Trade Practices Court.While the scramble for cover by the establishment is perhaps inevitable, it is time that the views so vigorously opined by the regulators are tested, as the judiciary has rarely, if ever, been given the opportunity to examine the issues in depth.The mischief ...

  • Rafferty hands CBA reins to fraud specialist after two years as head

    6-Mar-1997

    ANNE Rafferty QC has stood down as chair of the Criminal Bar Association (CBA) bringing "eight-and-a-half-years of unpaid service to the profession" to a close.Rafferty, a forthright critic of the last government's crime policies and once widely tipped as a future Bar Council chair, handed over the leadership of the CBA to fraud specialist Roy Amlot QC on 1 June.She said she was looking forward to concentrating exclusively on her criminal practice and confirmed ...

  • Shandwick opens unit aimed at Bar

    6-Mar-1997

    A new marketing and lobbying unit aimed primarily at barristers is being set up by Shandwick Consultants.The Legal Affairs Unit, which opens on 19 June, will be headed by Jon McLeod, who is currently account director at Westminster Strategy where he handles media relations for the Bar Council.McLeod said the unit would offer a combination of public affairs and PR advice. "Quite often people, such as those in commercial chambers, are interested in getting ahead ...

  • Sussex to appeal for right to decide on home tuition

    6-Mar-1997

    East Sussex County Council is to appeal against a High Court decision that has prevented cash-strapped local authorities from cutting an estimated 150,000 children's home tuition.In April Mr Justice Keene ruled that the council's need to make budget savings could not be taken into account in deciding to cut 15-year-old Beth Tandy's home tuition from five to three hours a week.Tandy was diagnosed with ME in 1990 and subsequently stopped attending ...

  • The Lawyer Inquiry: Barrie Barker

    6-Mar-1997

    Barrie Barker was born in Liverpool on 13 January 1943. He is a consultant lawyer at Collyer-Bristow. What was your first job?Delivering newspapers.What was your first ever salary as a lawyer?£1,250 per annum.What would you have done if you hadn't become a lawyer?Landscape gardener.Which law could you live without?Any law based ...

  • Time is of the essence

    6-Mar-1997

    For most lawyers the PC is a vital strategic tool. Many would no more consider practising law without one, than they would without a phone. So the question is no longer "Should I use a PC?" but "How can I use my PC investment to make my practice more efficient, competitive and profitable?" Part of the answer is to replace their inefficient paper timesheets with automated time-tracking software. Time-sheets drain profits out of a practice with as much as 20 to 40 per cent of the total ...

  • Turn on to intranets

    6-Mar-1997

    As the Internet enjoys explosive growth, it comes as something of a shock to find that the take up of intranets is estimated to be 10 times larger. But what is an intranet, how does it fit in with the Internet and your PC, and how do you use it?An intranet is the use of Internet technology within an organisation. Technically, it is a computer network which uses Internet standards (primarily TCP/IP) and tools (such as browsers).Although its ...

  • UN envoy to study UK judicial independence

    6-Mar-1997

    THE INDEPENDENCE of lawyers and judges throughout the UK is to come under scrutiny during an impending visit to the UK by a special UN envoy.A request by Param Cumaraswamy, the UN Special Rapporteur on the independence of judges and lawyers, to visit the UK, has already been granted by the UK government, although a date and itinerary have yet to be decided.A letter from Cumaraswamy to Nigel Williams, the UK's Ambassador to the United Nations in Geneva, which ...

  • US firm attracts second Ashursts' partner

    6-Mar-1997

    The London office of US firm Chadbourne & Parke has lured a second partner from City firm Ashurst Morris Crisp in the space of six months.Project finance expert Martyn Stewart-Smith starts this week as a partner with the US firm. He specialises in utilities law covering public sector restructuring, ...

  • Web Sites for wise legal eyes

    6-Mar-1997

    British lawyers are better known for their sense of tradition than an uninhibited desire for the unknown. But an increasing number of firms are stripping off their suits to go surfing as they advertise their wares on the World Wide Web.Masons special adviser, author and 'technoboffin' Richard Susskind says the web has revolutionised the way law firms advertise and the effectiveness of that advertising."Eighteen months ago, for a law firm ...

  • When care stops, does assistance begin?

    6-Mar-1997

    An application for judicial review seeks to define a council's responsibility for adults formerly in its care, says Roger Pearson. Justice Connell of the Family Division is currently considering an application for judicial review which could have wide-ranging implications for local authority care.The case of R v London Borough of Lambeth ex parte Caddell focuses on the legal obligations of local authorities towards youngsters they have cared for during their minority ...

  • White & Case takes first step on PR ladder

    6-Mar-1997

    New York firm White & Case has broken new ground for a US firm with a London office by hiring a full-time marketing specialist to establish its European marketing department.The firm, which heralded its expansionist ambitions last autumn when it announced it would be paying higher US salary rates to its English fee earners, has poached Oliver Pykett from Hammond Suddards' marketing ...

  • World co-ordination

    6-Mar-1997

    Chicago firm Mayer Brown & Platt is to run its international practice from London following a management committee's decision last month. Partner Jeff Gordon is returning to London in July to co-ordinate international strategy for all areas from Latin America to South East Asia.

  • Wrigleys lures two more partners away from Dibbs

    6-Mar-1997

    Partners at the Leeds-based private client practice Wrigleys - which broke away from Dibb Lupton Broomhead last year - have lured two more former colleagues, Tim Knight and Richard Sutton, into the partnership.The firm has also recruited Richard Archer, a consultant at Hammond Suddards, as a pensions, tax and private client consultant.Wrigleys was founded a year ago by Matthew Wrigley and Ann Duchart from Dibb Lupton Broomhead (now Dibb Lupton Alsop) after Dibbs ...