20 January 1997

The Lawyer

  • 25-strong law team speeds Caradon deal

    21-Jan-1997

    A team of 25 lawyers from SJ Berwin & Co and lawyers from seven other firms acted on Vector Industries' £200m purchase of more than 65 companies and 15 engineering and distribution businesses of building products group Caradon.SJ Berwin's corporate finance partner Matthew Hudson said his team, representing Vector, had worked "day and night" on the transaction.Vector ...

  • A new lease of life on conveyancing

    21-Jan-1997

    Conveyancing has come back to haunt the legal profession. The healthy growth of the property market, which should have been joyful news for all, comes in a poisoned chalice with the news that not only is estate agent Hambro Countrywide preparing to tackle the marketplace but the building societies are also looking at innovative ideas for conveyancing.Once again, solicitors in general are left sitting on the sidelines in defensive mode. It is easy to blame ...

  • Additions to the banking casebook

    21-Jan-1997

    Over the past year, there have been a number of important cases involving banking, building societies and financial services in which leading counsel and their juniors have established their reputations and raised important questions in new areas of the law. Among these cases are NRG, BBL and BCCI (No. 8), which covered issues ranging from misrepresentation and jurisdictional issues to a bank's responsibility to its customers.In choosing the right counsel to assist ...

  • Bakers woos lawyer

    21-Jan-1997

    Baker & McKenzie's London office has poached Marwan Al-Turki from fellow US firm Mayer Brown & Platt to head its financial regulatory practice. Al-Turki joined Baker & Mckenzie in December from Mayer's London office. He said that Baker & McKenzie's European connections had enticed him away from ...

  • Barrister gets race case heard

    21-Jan-1997

    A BARRISTER who accused her former set of racial discrimination has won leave to have her case heard by the Court of Appeal.Joy Okoye's case against Staple Inn Chambers was struck out by circuit judge Quentin Edwards QC last September when he described her claims against the chambers variously as frivolous and out of time.But now two Court of Appeal judges, Lord Justices Hirst and Judge, have granted the barrister leave to appeal to the court.The ...

  • Barrister trainees take to TV as stars of the show

    21-Jan-1997

    PUPIL barristers are set to become the latest lawyers to be put under the documentary makers' microscope - and the programme is looking for chambers to take part in the project.Zenith North Film & Television Productions is planning to follow the highs and lows of a group of students through their training. The project has won support from the Bar Council and the Inns of Court School of Law, although Channel Four has yet to give it the green light.Zenith ...

  • Blood negligence claim

    21-Jan-1997

    A man from Marazion, Cornwall, who claims he contracted the hepatitis C virus as a result of bone marrow transplant surgery, is taking the Department of Health to the High Court. IJ Caldwell is also suing the National Blood Authority, Royal Cornwall Hospital NHS Trust, Avon Health Authority, and the Committee on Safety of Medicines, claiming he became infected with the hepatitis C virus through their negligence during blood transfusions, and transfusions .

  • Boost for Lovells

    21-Jan-1997

    Lovell White Durrant has expanded its Chicago office from 11 lawyers to 17 in the past three months. The latest recruit to Lovells' niche reinsurance and consumer credit litigation practice in Chicago, which opened just under two years ago with the poaching of two partners from Chicago firm Sidley & Austin, is Anne Fortney. Joining with "of-counsel" (consultant) status, Fortney was for 10 years a partner with the Washington DC office of Carlsmith Ball Wichman Case & Ichiki and ...

  • Child charity targets trauma with witness video release

    21-Jan-1997

    The children's charity Barnardos has launched a video designed to reduce the trauma experienced by child witnesses in child sex abuse and other criminal cases.The eight-minute video, called You're Going to be a Witness, is produced in the style of a children's television programme.It was made with the co-operation of the Teesside Combined Court Centre and is reported to have the approval of the police, judges and social services.Tink ...

  • Courts tackle sporting injuries

    21-Jan-1997

    Both the High Court and Court of Appeal have stressed that the case last year, in which rugby referee Michael Nolan was held liable for serious injuries suffered by a player in the collapse of a scrum, will not open a floodgate of claims against referees.However, the outcome of the action involving plaintiff Ben Smoldon, who was left paralysed by injuries he received when he was 17, is bound to add a new dimension to sporting claims. They expose ...

  • DAC man claims a win for Lloyds

    21-Jan-1997

    Davies Arnold Cooper litigation partner Andrew Higgs is claiming a landmark victory for the 19 Lloyd's underwriting syndicates in the Court of Appeal after a five-year battle with minerals trader Glencore.Higgs said: "This judgment puts a cap on a developing line of law and should lead to a reduction of litigation in the marine insurance market."When an insured company has a dispute with its insurer about what its policy actually covers, the test used, known ...

  • Denton Hall fights back as Morgan Lewis & Bockius woos high-flier

    21-Jan-1997

    Denton Hall has managed to limit the damage from a poaching attempt by US firm Morgan Lewis & Bockius of two of its highest-flying litigation partners.Leading fraud litigation lawyer Robert Goldspink is negotiating a reduction of his nine-month notice so he can make an early start at Morgan Lewis. His colleague, rising intellectual property litigation star James Irvine, has agreed to stay, although Dentons would not say what inducements it had offered."Any indications ...

  • Extradition moves

    21-Jan-1997

    Representatives of the Home Office have made a "firm offer" to Spanish lawyers to visit their counterparts in the UK so that British drug barons and money launderers who are operating from the Costa del Sol can be extradited without "hiccups". Home Office Parliamentary under-secretary with responsibility for drugs, Tom Sackville, made the offer to his opposite number while on a trip to Madrid last week. "It is vitally important," said Sackville, "to both the UK and Spain that the extradition ...

  • Financings

    21-Jan-1997

    SJ Berwin advised on the establishment of car finance company On-Line Finance. Clifford Chance advised Merrill Lynch

  • Financings

    21-Jan-1997

    Travers Smith Braithwaite acted for Save & Prosper on its £80m recommended reconstruction scheme for Save & Prosper Linked Investment Trust.

  • First judicial assistants arrive at Appeal Court

    21-Jan-1997

    The Court of Appeal has appointed its first batch of pupil barristers and trainee assistants to fill its controversial new "judicial assistant" posts.Of the six that started work last week only two are solicitors and only one, Graeme Johnston, is from a City firm, Herbert Smith. The other four are appointed from the Bar. But it is understood that of the 17 assistants so far selected, there are nine from the Bar and eight solicitors.The judicial assistant scheme, ...

  • Flotations

    21-Jan-1997

    Manches & Co acted for computer software developer Eidos on its £21.95m listing of 3 million American depository shares on Nasdaq. Lead underwriters to the offer were JP Morgan Securities and Volpe Welty & Company, advised by Linklaters & Paines. Norton Rose advised the Eidos sponsor Charterhouse Tilney ...

  • Fountain Court senior clerk looks set to depart chambers

    21-Jan-1997

    Chris Fogarty reportsFountain Court Chambers senior clerk Barry Down is planning to leave the leading commercial set.His departure is yet to be confirmed, but The Lawyer understands that he is still in discussions with the set and it is expected that he will leave the chambers on an amicable basis.Down could not be contacted for comment last week, when callers to the set were being told the senior clerk was "away" until later in ...

  • Funding conundrum

    21-Jan-1997

    Tony Holland (The Lawyer, 7 January) comes up with a useful suggestion about funding access to justice through expenses insurance, but the problems are likely to be more difficult than he admits.In our system, the losing party pays the costs of the winner. There are sound reasons for this, but it does not sit easily with a profit-oriented insurer funding cases.In medical insurance, an insurer can anticipate that x per cent of its policyholders ...

  • Glitter Bands fight over leaders of the gang

    21-Jan-1997

    Another Chancery Division pop battle is looming in 1997, this time between members of Gary Glitter's former group, the Glitter Band.In a preliminary pre-Christmas skirmish, two members of the original chart-topping Glitter Band took a former member to court to curb his activities with a rival, and they claim bogus, Glitter Band.At the end of that brief hearing Mr Justice Rattee refused moves which could have led to former Glitter ...

  • Government questioned on EDS contracts

    21-Jan-1997

    The House of Commons Public Accounts committee (PAC) has expressed concern that IT supplier EDS might be becoming the dominant supplier of IT services to the Government.EDS recently won a £20-£25m contract to supply IT services to all crown and county courts in England and Wales.In a critical report on the outsourcing of social security work by the Government Information Technology Services Agency, PAC says: "We put it to the agency that ...

  • In brief: CICB chair lambasts Government plans

    21-Jan-1997

    Lord Carlisle QC, chairman of the Criminal Injuries Compensation Board, attacked the government's planned sentencing reforms in a speech last Friday at the University of Hertfordshire's Law School. He described the government's Crimes (Sentences) Bill as "unnecessary and unjustified". He added: "Whatever may happen, one thing one can predict with certainty is that the prison population will be higher than it is at the moment."

  • In brief: Indemnity specialist switches to Dibbs

    21-Jan-1997

    Dibb Lupton Alsop has recruited Chris Sharrock as a partner in its London-based professional indemnity practice. Sharrock moves from Barlow Lyde & Gilbert where he was a partner for nine years. Kevin Mcloughlin, head of Dibbs' insurance group, welcomed the move, which he said was amicable. "He is a fine lawyer and is he well connected in financial services," said Mcloughlin. "We were looking for a professional indemnity specialist for a while so he is ideal. He also has experience ...

  • In brief: Jersey firm appoints accountancy adviser

    21-Jan-1997

    Former Arthur Andersen partner Jeremy Arnold has been hired by Jersey law firm Ogier & Le Masurier to act as a non-executive adviser to the partners. Arnold, 58, spent nearly 40 years working for major accountancy practices before his recent retirement from Arthur Andersen. Ogiers' chairman Malcolm Sinel said Arnold would be able to use his business consulting skills to give the firm valuable strategic advice.

  • In brief: Land Registry acts to tighten up rules

    21-Jan-1997

    The Land Registry has tightened its rules for solicitors taking statutory declarations on lost or destroyed title deeds. The move follows a case in which a pensioner was conned out of his home when someone impersonated him to obtain a certificate from the registry. The registry has issued guidelines requiring solicitors or licensed conveyancers to provide the applicant's permanent address, date of birth and a passport-sized photograph certified on the back by the solicitor. The ...

  • In brief: Penningtons hires family law associate

    21-Jan-1997

    Penningtons has recruited Richard Price, a partner with Wedlake Saint for 27 years, to head the family law department at its Newbury office, as an associate. Price's "cross-office team" consists of a senior assistant at Newbury and a junior assistant based in Basingstoke. There are plans to recruit one more assistant. Julian Chadwick, managing partner at the Newbury Office, said the move was a ...

  • In brief: SFA lawyer moves to Hammond Suddards

    21-Jan-1997

    Securities and Futures Authority (SFA) legal adviser Susan Dunnett is the latest to join Hammond Suddards expanding banking and financial services group, following the recruiting of Bruce Gardner from SJ Berwin. Dunnett was assistant solicitor at Theodore Goddard before becoming senior legal adviser at the SFA. The group also recently recruited barrister Iona Levine, a derivatives specialist, from HSBC, ...

  • In brief: Wilde Sapte takes on telecoms solicitor

    21-Jan-1997

    Wilde Sapte has recruited telecommunications lawyer Gerald Wakefield to its major projects group. Australian-qualified Wakefield was until the end of last August head of Charles Russell's telecommunications group. He left, initially to join a telecommunications regulatory body, but ended up working on a consultancy basis for intellectual property firm Rouse & Co. He said: "At Charles Russell ...

  • In-house lawyers' errors played part in £7m loss

    21-Jan-1997

    Lawyers at Westminster City Council have been implicated in a chain of errors that cost the London borough £7.1m.Two independent investigations commissioned by the London council have found that its legal department was partly responsible for failing to bill leaseholders for repairs and maintenance over a six-year period.Under legislation introduced in 1988, lessees who are not notified of the cost of repairs within 18 months are not responsible for paying ...

  • INVESTED INTERESTS

    21-Jan-1997

    Barlow Clowes, Lloyd's, BCCI, Maxwell, home income plans, pension-mis-selling, Barings; these are just a few of the names and terms that have gained notoriety in recent years as the courts, regulators, lawyers and accountants have increasingly had to grapple with fraud and negligence in the financial services sector.The immediate victims range from some of the most vulnerable in our society who have been relieved of their meagre savings to the largest banks and financial ...

  • Kiwi lawyer chosen to keep City at top of financial tree

    21-Jan-1997

    Judith Mayhew, Wilde Sapte's director of training, has been elected unopposed to the leadership of the City Corporation, one of the world's richest local authorities.Deputy chair of the corporation's policy and resources committee for the past four years, she succeeds Michael Cassidy, senior partner of City law firm Maxwell Batley, as its chair. This will effectively make her the leader of the corporation.Mayhew, a New Zealand-raised and qualified ...

  • Law firm's logo pushes 'fresh' image

    21-Jan-1997

    City-based international law firm Richards Butler has become the latest law firm to adopt a new logo, which it hopes will make its name instantly recognisable.The logo is the first phase of an overhaul of the firm's entire internal and external communications system.Richards Butler said it wanted a logo that was contemporary, sharp and eye-catching but also in keeping with traditional values associated with the legal profession.Chief executive ...

  • Law Soc urges EC to action on Poland

    21-Jan-1997

    The European Commission has been urged by the Law Society to take "urgent action at the highest possible level" to prevent the Polish government from enacting a law to effectively bar foreign lawyers from practising.A letter urging the Commission to act was sent from the society's Brussels office by its representative, Patrick Oliver."We believe this draft legislation is contrary to Poland's treaty obligations under the Poland-EU Association Agreement," ...

  • Law Society backs Police Bill changes

    21-Jan-1997

    The Law Society and the Bar Council have offered their backing for amendments to the Police Bill tabled by the Labour Party which are designed to preserve legal privilege.The move follows a flurry of lobbying from the legal profession.The proposed amendment, drafted with help from the Law Society, states that surveillance of normal communications between a legal adviser and his or her client would be permitted only if there was evidence that an abuse of legal ...

  • Lawyer calls for 'cybermarks'

    21-Jan-1997

    Alison Laferla reportsIntellectual property lawyer David Flint is calling for the creation of "cybermarks" to clarify the position of trade marks published on the internet.Flint, a partner in the intellectual property and technology law group at Glasgow firm MacRoberts, describes cybermarks as "a form of right akin to a trade mark for use in relation ...

  • Linklaters pulls clear in dealmakers' league

    21-Jan-1997

    Linklaters & Paines has scored a hat trick, coming top of Corporate Money's takeover table for deals over £1m published this week, as well as last week's Acquisitions Monthly public takeover league table and the The Sunday Times' UK dealmakers league table.Corporate Money's table, which includes cross-border deals and lists only advisers to companies, shows Freshfields ...

  • Litigation Disciplinary Tribunals 21/01/97

    21-Jan-1997

    Dennis Owen Williams, admitted 1979, struck off April 1993, refused restoration to Roll and ordered to pay £693 costs. The tribunal was told that Williams, of Bishop's Stortford, Hertfordshire, was struck off after allegations were substantiated that he improperly transferred client money to his office account, failed to pay part of his insurance indemnity, acted contrary to duty to act in good faith and best interests of clients, ...

  • Litigation Personal Injury 21/01/97

    21-Jan-1997

    Stockbridge v Gutteridge and anr - QBD, 2 December 1996Claimant: Liam Stockbridge, 24Incident: Road traffic accidentInjuries: Claimant was a passenger in the rear seat of a vehicle and sustained multiple injuries, including severe head wounds. Although he is now tetraplegic and confined to a wheelchair he is capable of managing his own affairs. Claimant was an apprentice lift engineer at the time of the accidentAward: £1.3m ...

  • Litigation Recent Decisions 21/01/97

    21-Jan-1997

    Unlawful restriction on talking to journalists on prison visitsR v Secretary of State for the Home Department ex parte (1) Ian Simms (2) Michael Alan Mark O'Brien (1997)QBD (Latham J) 19/12/96Summary: As to the lawfulness of a blanket restriction on oral communication between prisoners and journalists during prison visits, in the absence of undertakings by journalists not to use information so obtained for professional purposes.

  • Litigation Writs 21/01/97

    21-Jan-1997

    A man from Strood in Kent, who was severely injured when a heavy gate fell on him at work, is suing his former employers. John Kindness, 49, received nine fractured ribs and further fractures to his collar bone, sternum, left ankle and other injuries in the accident on 7 August 1993, according to his writ. Now he is suing Veetee Rice, of Strood, Kent, and gate supplier Gilmer, of Lewes, East Sussex, which on 25 April 1994 ...

  • London firms call a halt to merger talks

    21-Jan-1997

    Merger talks between Bailey Shaw & Gillet and Wedlake Bell have broken down.The two medium-sized London firms had confirmed they were in talks last November.Now, in a joint statement, Mark Hodgkinson, the Baileys partner in charge of negotiating the merger, and Bob Salter, managing partner at Wedlake Bell, have announced a halt to the talks. "Both firms identified matters that ...

  • Lords to hear murder appeal

    21-Jan-1997

    Philip English, who was ordered to be detained at Her Majesty's Pleasure after his conviction at Teesside Crown Court in February 1995 for murder, has won leave to challenge his conviction in the House of Lords. His appeal raises questions relating to the proof necessary for the conviction for murder of a secondary party to a killing.

  • LPC review. LPC's end-of-term assessment

    21-Jan-1997

    A recent review of the Legal Practice Course (LPC) concluded that it required greater flexibility to meet the needs of different types of practice more closely.But will the inevitable changes to the LPC set out in the review and now approved by the Law Society meet the needs of all practices when recruiting suitable trainees? Or does it simply meet the needs of the City-based and larger commercial firms?The LPC, which began life in September 1993, replaced the ...

  • Maybelline counsel is made up to Moscow

    21-Jan-1997

    White & Case has head-hunted commercial in-house lawyer Michael Onischenko to manage its Moscow office.Onischenko joined the firm earlier this month from US cosmetics company Maybelline, where he was assistant general counsel.He said he was offered a post with L'Oreal after it took over Maybelline but decided to move to Moscow where he believed he could make best use ...

  • Mears attacks Law Soc's use of barristers for advice

    21-Jan-1997

    The Law Society Council will this week vote on a proposal by former president Martin Mears to go to City solicitors rather than barristers when seeking legal opinion on policy options.During Mears' term of office many of his policy initiatives - setting a minimum conveyancing fee, restricting entry to the profession - were scuppered by unfavourable opinions from counsel. Last July a barrister's opinion prevented the then treasurer Mike Howells from remitting part ...

  • Merger in the Midlands

    21-Jan-1997

    Long-standing Wolverhampton firms Manby & Steward and Woolley Beavon have merged.Two of Woolley Beavon's three partners will join seven other partners at the merged firm which will retain the name Manby & Steward. Woolley Beavon's third partner, John Robbins, who has recently retired, will act as a consultant.It is Manby & Steward's first major merger since it opened its doors in 1825.Woolley Beavon's two assistant solicitors and ...

  • Michael Pointer says Landau raises many new questions

    21-Jan-1997

    Although the case of Re: Ivan aubrey Landau 967/96 clearly resolves one question it also raises many other far-reaching issues.For example, cases will need to be kept open for more than 20 years; distributions will probably be made only every year or two; and contact with creditors may be a long-term problem.Where cases have been reopened, a trustee could proceed against the debtor to receive past tax-free lump sums and annuities.In some ...

  • New law centre too noisy, say students

    21-Jan-1997

    A prestigious new law faculty at Cambridge University has run into problems over "unwelcome" noise levels which students claim makes it difficult to work in.The university has commissioned an independent report to investigate the acoustics at the Cambridge University Law Faculty following the complaints about the building, designed by the architects Sir Norman Foster & Partners, which was opened in March last year.First year law student Kuwant Thandi praised ...

  • Part-time expansion

    21-Jan-1997

    With reference to the article in The Lawyer, 7 January, concerning the position of Nottingham Law School, I would like to correct any impression given that we are reducing our commitment to the Legal Practice Course via the part-time route.In fact we are fully committed to the concept of the part-time LPC courses and that is why we plan to increase the numbers of students who will be able to study the block release version of the course.Our view ...

  • Polish tax ace switches to US firm

    21-Jan-1997

    Tomasz Kacymirow, known as the foremost tax expert in Poland, has left KPMG to join US firm Hunton & Williams in a move that has been described as "ground-breaking".Lejb Fogelman, head of Hunton & Williams in Warsaw, said the appointment had set a precedent in Poland because Kacymirow is the first full domestic partner in a foreign firm with full voting and equity rights and because previously the big six accountancy firms had all the best tax lawyers."Other ...

  • Powell takes over at 2 Crown Office Row

    21-Jan-1997

    John Powell QC has been elected unopposed as the new head of chambers at 2 Crown Office Row. He will take over from Rupert Jackson QC.The chambers has a policy of electing a new head every three years in order to share the workload.Powell, who specialises in fraud and professional services negligence litigation, has also been appointed as chair of the Bar Council's Law Reform Committee.He will continue to write for a number of publications ...

  • Protests force Apil to relax 'ambulance-chasing' clause

    21-Jan-1997

    THE leadership of the Association of Personal Injury Lawyers (Apil) has yielded to the demands of its membership and watered down a key clause in a new code of conduct designed to stamp out "ambulance chasing".The organisation's executive was forced to revise clause 10 of its new code of conduct, concerning referral fees, following protests by its members at an Apil conference last November. The original clause read: "No Apil member shall receive fees for the introduction ...

  • Salary gap narrows for in-house lawyers

    21-Jan-1997

    A report released earlier this month reveals that the earnings gap between lawyers working in-house in US corporations and private firms has continued to narrow.The findings are contained in US consultants Altman Weil Pensa's Law Department Compensation Benchmarking Survey, which has been conducted annually since 1974.According to the report, almost one in 10 chief legal officers (CLOs) now earns over $500,000 a year. And it reveals that in the manufacturing ...

  • Scottish Supreme Court judges to be given first formal training

    21-Jan-1997

    Supreme Court judges in Scotland are to receive formal training following the creation of a Judicial Studies Committee, it was announced last week.The new body, the membership of which is to be decided, is to be chaired by Lord Ross, former Lord Justice Clerk. It will promote training for Supreme Court and Sheriff Court judges.There has been little if any formal training for Supreme Court judges in the past.Announcing the creation of the committee, ...

  • Serious Fraud Office. Trials and tribulations

    21-Jan-1997

    Despite the position's reputation as a "bed of nails", about 40 people have applied for the job as director of the Serious Fraud Office (SFO). The applicants include judges, lawyers working for the Civil Service, the City's regulatory bodies, the public sector, private practice and the Bar. As one prosecutor puts it: "If you win, the attitude is any mug could have done it but if you lose, you are lambasted."The first round of interviews is due to be completed by ...

  • Sinagapore's Chor Pee & Co divides

    21-Jan-1997

    LEADING Singapore firm Chor Pee & Company has split up following a management dispute between the partners.The 28-fee-earner firm broke into two camps following the dispute and auditors from Deloitte & Touche have been called in to establish who owns what. Lim Chor Pee, one of the founders of the firm, has become managing partner of a new practice, Chor Pee & Partners, taking 20 of the 28 lawyers from the original firm with him.Meanwhile, three of the original ...

  • Soccer to be major City player, predict lawyers

    21-Jan-1997

    Lawyers are predicting all Premiership and many first division clubs will go public on the stock market as City interest in the business of football intensifies.Last week Southampton Football Club was admitted to the Stock Exchange's Official List. Its shares had been suspended at 47p and went to 170p on the opening of trading last Tuesday. At the same time, shares in West Bromwich Albion, admitted to AIM at the beginning of January at 100p, were trading at over 400p.

  • Solicitors counter conveyancing threat

    21-Jan-1997

    Surrey solicitors are planning to set up a property centre to directly compete against estate agent Hambro Countrywide's new in-house convey- ancing service.And, in a separate development which will increase the pressure on solicitors to respond to growing competition, the Halifax Building Society is poised to unveil a new title insurance service which would cut conveyancers out of remortgages.The Surrey solicitors have been spurred into action by Hambros' ...

  • Talent at the top of the junior Bar league

    21-Jan-1997

    More and more of the solicitors who make recommendations for the stars at the Bar comment that they instruct silks and keep the work normally done by junior counsel for solicitor-advocates and in-house senior solicitors. so it is inevitable that the junior Bar is seeing the sense, commercially and legally, in specialising.As one practitioner puts it, "good juniors are like gold dust. With the well-known silks in great demand, we are seeing less of ...

  • The American way is not for the UK

    21-Jan-1997

    Americanisation. Why do we have to have it thrust down our throats? Especially Americanisation of the law.The UK government attacked the French for trying to protect the European film industry and European culture - yet our children are so exposed to US television and films they are more familiar with the topography of North America than of the UK, certainly of our European neighbours. To be sure, they know more about the US justice system than our own.

  • The charge of the legal Light Brigade

    21-Jan-1997

    With several well-known names from the financial sector appearing in court and hitting the headlines, this area of litigation is proving lucrative for lawyers on both sides of the profession. Inevitably, there is a certain amount of overlap with the commercial Bar.This list of barristers is not exhaustive, but it is based on the subjective recommendations of leading banking and financial sector practitioners.The leading sets in this area include Fountain Court ...

  • The Lawyer Inquiry: Mark Humphries

    21-Jan-1997

    Mark Humphries was born in Bath on 5 February 1962. He is a solicitor-advocate and partner at Linklaters & Paines. What was your first job?Warehouseman at Marks & Spencer in Bath.What was your first ever salary as a lawyer?£3,300.What would you have done if you hadn’t become a solicitor?

  • Trainee adds to action against Freshfields

    21-Jan-1997

    Katherine Cawthorn, the trainee suing her employer Freshfields for loss of career after she contracted dysentery on a business trip to Ghana, has made a further claim of sex discrimination against the firm.In her discrimination pleading, Cawthorn alleges that while she had to ask to return home from Ghana and was left to make her own travel arrangements, a male Freshfields trainee (referred to as "Owen") who contracted cancer of the tongue after being sent on a business ...

  • US Bar shows the way forward for pro bono

    21-Jan-1997

    Although the concept of pro bono work was embraced in the UK many years ago, lawyers have traditionally been left to offer it on an ad hoc basis and, in contrast to the US, centrally organised pro bono programmes are only just being set up.The Bar pro bono unit, set up for barristers last June, is still in its infancy, and the solicitors' pro bono group, which aims to encourage solicitors to do pro bono work, has yet to reach even that stage. And a third body, the solicitors' ...

  • White & Case chooses London base for latest commodity set-up

    21-Jan-1997

    US firm White & Case is set to launch a commodity and trade finance practice at its London office, bringing it closer to the City's powerful financial institutions.It has appointed its Paris finance partner Nicholas Budd to head the new London group.Budd is in the process of making a slow transition between the two offices but he should be firmly established in London ...

  • Wind-up offer severs historic Ashurst link

    21-Jan-1997

    Ashurst Morris Crisp has acted on the winding up of its oldest client, the River Plate and General Investment Trust.Roger Walsom, for 10 years contact partner for the trust, which was originally set up to invest in the South American economic boom of the 1880s, said: "The transaction was rather poignant for us. The trust has been a client since its incorporation 108 years ago."In ...