17 February 1997

The Lawyer

  • A prop for property

    18-Feb-1997

    The Investment Property Forum has sent out more than 2,020 copies of Readiness for Sale, its code of practice on streamlining commercial property transactions.It was published with the support of several major property industry bodies to promote faster and more efficient transfer of property with a view to enhancing the liquidity of property as an investment medium.The Forum is keen to ascertain whether the Code is beginning to have any impact in practice, ...

  • Accountants against the law: a competition time is coming

    18-Feb-1997

    The news of the launch of Coopers & Lybrand's law firm has created more of a ripple than a splash in the marketplace. But the waves will follow eventually.The top 10 City law firms have noted that Arthur Andersen's three-and-a-half-year-old firm, Garrett & Co, which has more than 100 lawyers, is still to affect their market. And they hardly spare a thought for Price Waterhouse's Arnheim & Co, which is about to celebrate its first birthday with only 15 lawyers ...

  • Applying the law of nature

    18-Feb-1997

    I was amused to read Paul Marsh's letter in defence of dinosaurs (The Lawyer, 11 February). I am very surprised that Mr Marsh does not appear to be aware that solicitors in Scotland have successfully been selling property for hundreds of years.He also makes reference to two property cases in Surrey where claims have been made on the Compensation Fund.A solicitor of his experience should know better than to seek to draw conclusions from cases such as ...

  • Appointments

    18-Feb-1997

    Davies Arnold Cooper has been reappointed to advise the Wigan & Leigh NHS Trust for another five years following a beauty contest.Donns is to join a panel handling uninsured loss-recovery claims for Leeds-based motor insurance company Privilege Insurance.

  • Asylum Act Now. All the answers...

    18-Feb-1997

    Did you know that Mobo was a dog on 1960s kids TV, or that, according to the RSPCA, the best way to kill a lobster is to freeze it for two hours at -20C and then boil it? Do you care?If you do, then you probably did The Lawyer Christmas Quiz, and are still mulling over the ones you couldn't get. Not knowing all the answers is probably driving you mad.So, here, in the interests of your sanity, are the answers. Just look up your lovingly-kept issue from 17 ...

  • Asylum act. Checks and balance for workers

    18-Feb-1997

    The Asylum and Immigration Act 1996, which came into force on 27 January, is regarded by many as a cynical attempt by the Government to turn employers into immigration officers by placing employers under a statutory duty to check the status of all job applicants.Section 8 of the Act makes it a criminal offence for an employer to employ any person aged 16 or over after this date who is "subject to immigration control" - in brief, this means any person who does not have leave ...

  • B&M loses leading partner

    18-Feb-1997

    Clifford Chance has recruited a top Baker & McKenzie construction partner to head up a new construction unit.Tim Steadman joins Clifford Chance on 3 March and will work with partner Alan Elias and a team of seven fee-earners to develop the firm's non-contentious construction practice worldwide.

  • Back in business

    18-Feb-1997

    The buzz words circulating in chancery chambers these days are 'bus- iness law' and 'financial law'. These denominations are well justified by the work actually being done. Even the property and trusts experts are focusing their marketing strategies on the business community. It is now well understood that the Chancery Division is a commercial court. It tackles all of the important areas of business litigation, apart from shipping. This is why it remains the busiest ...

  • Bar chair Owen slams Police Bill and calls for rights in law

    18-Feb-1997

    Bar Council chair Robert Owen has condemned the government's Police Bill, saying it demonstrates the need to incorporate the European Convention on Human Rights into domestic law.Addressing a meeting on the Police Bill last week, which was held jointly by the Law Society, Liberty and Justice, Owen said: "Much as we welcome Michael Howard's conversion, the history of this Bill is disturbing."The Bill in its first form represented a serious erosion of ...

  • Berrymans and Lace Mawer merge

    18-Feb-1997

    Berrymans and Lace Mawer have merged to create a national defence insurance law firm, to be called Berrymans Lace Mawer.With 250 fee earners, 80 of them partners, it is by far the largest insurance law firm in the country, and one of the 30 largest law firms overall.The motivation to create the practice was demand from the large clients of insurers to have one law practice ...

  • Big Six take graduates with Law Soc blessing

    18-Feb-1997

    The Big Six accountancy firms are beginning to actively recruit young graduate lawyers in anticipation of a regulation change that will allow multi-disciplinary partnerships.Trainee Solicitors Group education officer Nikki Pope said there was no statistical information yet available, but strong anecdotal evidence suggested some of the brightest students were being lured to accountancy firms."In the short term they've got the advantage of someone who knows ...

  • Boundaries blur at the Bar

    18-Feb-1997

    The crossover of counsel from the commercial Bar into the rarefied atmosphere of the Chancery Division has been a trend for a few years. More recently, however, solicitors are observing that chancery barristers are also dipping into the more robust realms of the commercial courts and the Queen's Bench Division.As one leading practitioner comments: "It seems they are becoming more commercial in their outlook and in the work they are willing to take on."

  • Clearing up environmental waste matter

    18-Feb-1997

    A leading Kent waste recycling company has won the right to mount a High Court challenge over implementation of EU laws aimed at protecting the environment.The case is to be heard as a matter of urgency and is expected to reach court before the start of the summer vacation.At the centre of the action is Bexleyheath-based company Dockgrange, which claims restrictions in respect of importation of waste material from Germany and Holland, imposed upon it ...

  • College eyes global market for education

    18-Feb-1997

    The College of Law wants to open campuses outside the UK according to chief executive Nigel Savage."I think eventually the college will be looking to establish colleges overseas. Legal practice is becoming global, therefore legal education needs to become global," he said.His comments came as the college unveiled a multimillion-pound strategic plan which included a proposal to open a £10m campus in Birmingham and a deal to provide material for the Open ...

  • Coopers loses law unit head

    18-Feb-1997

    In what could be seen as a vote of no confidence for Coopers & Lybrand's planned new law firm, the head of Coopers' employment law unit, Tim Johnson, is leaving to join Arnheim & Co, the firm controlled by Price Waterhouse.Johnson said he did not want to be associated with any negative comments about the new firm, Tite & Lewis, and described it as "innovative".Nevertheless, it is understood he did not want to be a part of the firm, to be run by two ...

  • Court-forced Caesareans to be contested

    18-Feb-1997

    Lawyers go to the Family Court Division on Tuesday to challenge the power of judges to order forced Caesareans on pregnant women.Leigh Day & Co solicitor Richard Stein and 12 Gray's Inn Square barrister Barbara Hewson, representing an unnamed woman who underwent a court-ordered Caesarean, will be asking for application for leave for a judicial review.Under the Mental Health Act if the court decides a woman is mentally incompetent it can order a Caesarean.

  • CPS lawyer forces union vote

    18-Feb-1997

    A FORMER CPS prosecutor has launched an unprecedented electoral challenge for the leadership of the top civil servant's union.Tony Engel, who retired recently as a crown prosecutor after eight years with the CPS, has launched his bid to replace Baroness Elizabeth Symons as head of the Association of First Division Civil Servants (FDA) with a promise to bring democracy to the union.In his election manifesto, Engel claims that the FDA "has been very good at ...

  • Disabled dilemmas

    18-Feb-1997

    The difficulties faced by disabled solicitors were all too poignantly pointed out at the inaugural conference for the Group for Solicitors with Disabilities. Finding training contracts is still extremely difficult, with firms showing little courage in their attitude to such applications. The humiliations which some have had to endure in the course of interviews are also galling, and few firms seem to have wheelchair access.While this is indicative of the general ...

  • Disabled lawyers say finding a contract is toughest barrier

    18-Feb-1997

    LAW firms are continuing to discriminate against graduates with disabilities despite the Law Society's efforts to stamp out discrimination in the profession, an inaugural conference for solicitors heard.Delegates at the first national conference of The Group for Solicitors with Disabilities, held in Liverpool on 8 February, agreed that it was even more difficult for disabled people to obtain training contracts than for others.This makes the search for contracts ...

  • Eversheds is appointed to be in-house Barclaycard lawyer

    18-Feb-1997

    Eversheds has been appointed as the in-house lawyer for Barclaycard under an arrangement which will see a solicitor based permanently at the headquarters of the credit card company.Eversheds' Leeds head of litigation, Howard Bryan, said the solicitor would work alongside the large in-house legal team at Barclaycard.He said the move would protect Barclaycard from the £50,000 ...

  • Fee rises make sense, says Lord Chancellor

    18-Feb-1997

    The Lord Chancellor defended the recent increases in civil court fees last week, saying that continued subsidy of the courts would "distort choices" when looking at different ways of resolving disputes.In a speech on the future of civil justice, made to guests of the Consumers Association, Lord Mackay said: "I believe that if the cost of the service falls on the parties before the court, rather that the hapless and absent taxpayer, all those involved in litigation, including ...

  • Fenwicks' top biller leaves for own firm

    18-Feb-1997

    Highly regarded five-partner niche construction firm Fenwick Elliott has lost its top biller partner Joseph Hannah and associate Timothy Mould who have resigned to set up their own practice.It is believed Hannah, who has worked at Fenwicks since 1989 and has been a partner there for five-and-a-half years, was in dispute with the partnership, but Hannah himself was unable to comment. ...

  • Financing

    18-Feb-1997

    Linklaters & Paines advised Banque Paribas and Caisse des Depots et Consignations, the lead managers, on an issue by the European Investment Bank of one billion Euro bonds due in 2004. It is the world's first Euro denominated bond issue. It will be payable in ECU until the third stage of monetary union (1999) when it will be payable in EUROs.

  • Flotations

    18-Feb-1997

    SJ Berwin advised vending organisation Provend Group on its £22m flotation on the London Stock Exchange. Osborne Clarke advised Henderson Crosthwaite

  • Flotations

    18-Feb-1997

    Frere Cholmeley Bischoff acted for C&B Publishing on its admission to AIM with a market capitalisation of £5.6m.

  • Freshfields associate quits for SJ Berwin in Brussels

    18-Feb-1997

    A PARIS lawyer has lodged a complaint with the European Commission against the UK and Guernsey over her treatment at the hands of a Guernsey magistrates' court.Monique Fauchon claims she was wrongfully refused permission to address Guernsey Magistrates' Court last summer when she was representing a French fisherman who was fined £10,000 for illegally fishing in Channel Island Waters. She also alleges that the fisherman was illegally detained in custody for ...

  • Freshfields asswociate quits for SJ Berwin in Brussels

    18-Feb-1997

    Patricia Boyle has left Freshfields, where she was a senior associate, to join the Brussels office of SJ Berwin as the "senior EU lawyer".As a specialist in the areas of telecomms, competition and intellectual property, she will be in charge of continuing the development of the existing Brussells-based telecomms practice."When the opportunity arose, I had no hesitation in joining," ...

  • Guide to a legal world apart

    18-Feb-1997

    Some specialist Bar Associations, as their names suggest, are concerned with particular subjects, such as personal injuries or employment law.The Chancery Bar Association is a more broadly-based association. It represents the divisions of the work of the High Court, and has just under 800 members - about 10 per cent of the practising Bar - mainly in London.Membership of the association is open to barristers "practising or intending to practise, primarily and ...

  • Helping out with HIV

    18-Feb-1997

    The publication of Professor Avrom Sherr's finding that a large number of lawyers have experience of acting for clients with the HIV virus or AIDS (The Lawyer, 4 February) is welcome, but not entirely unexpected.Recognition of the diverse areas of practice which can be relevant to people affected by HIV or AIDS is also helpful.Practitioners should be aware that the Terence Higgins Trust has the most extensive HIV/AIDS law library in the UK, ...

  • Herbert Smith wins procurement guide

    18-Feb-1997

    Herbert Smith's Brussels office has been awarded a prestigious contract by the European Commission to produce a guide explaining the remedies available to complainants in the field of public procurements.The guide will be produced primarily by partner Craig Pouncey and solicitor Adrian Brown. It will be published next year, and made widely available to the public to increase awareness of the procurement rules among suppliers and contractors throughout Europe.

  • In brief: Betts defends disclosure guidelines

    18-Feb-1997

    Secretary general of the Law Society Jane Betts has defended the Law Society's guidelines on disclosure of information, saying that far from clamping down on disclosure they are designed to facilitate openness. Writing in The Lawyer this week, Betts says the guidelines are "not intended to operate as a barrier" and will "make the secretary general and members of the management team of the society responsible for ensuring that council members' requests for information are met". ...

  • In brief: Denton Hall bowls out the competition

    18-Feb-1997

    City firm Denton Hall has beaten three other practices to go into bat as lawyer for the 1999 Cricket World Cup in England. Dentons, which also recently gained work on the 2002 Commonwealth Games in Manchester and for the Scottish Rugby Union, will be involved in all aspects of the cricket World Cup, ranging from the competition rules through to ticket distribution. The Dentons team, which is led by sports partners Adrian Bar-Smith and Nick West, will be working to tight deadlines with ...

  • In brief: Dutch bar heads off MDP threat in court

    18-Feb-1997

    The Dutch Bar has staved off preliminary attempts by Big Six accountancy firms Arthur Andersen & Co and Price Waterhouse to establish multi-disciplinary practices in the Netherlands. The district court of Amsterdam found that the existing ban on fully merged accountancy and law practices "is not excessive" and does not conflict with European legislation on competition. The President of the Dutch Bar Association, Tony Hudyecoper, was understandably "very happy" with the decision, which ...

  • In brief: Government sentences Bill defeat hailed

    18-Feb-1997

    The government defeat on the Crime (Sentences) Bill in the House of Lords last week has been welcomed by the Penal Affairs Consortium as striking "a blow for fairness and justice in sentencing". Opposition amendments giving judges discretion to set aside mandatory minimum sentences were carried by eight votes in the Lords last Thursday. Home Secretary Michael Howard said he would attempt to overturn the changes in the House of Commons.

  • In brief: Holland to be investment ombudsman

    18-Feb-1997

    Former Law Society president Anthony Holland has been appointed Personal Investment Authority ombudsman, replacing Stephen Edell who retires in June. Holland, a partner at Foot & Bowden since 1964, was Law Society president in 1990, and currently chairs the Social Security Appeals Tribunal. The PIA is currently handling the controversial personal pensions misselling review.

  • In brief: Linklaters scoops four more from Dibbs

    18-Feb-1997

    Dibb Lupton Alsop has lost four corporate recovery and insolvency specialists to Linklaters & Paines, including the well regarded former head of the practice at Dibb Lupton Broomhead, Anthony Bugg, and litigation partner Susan Kelly. None of the four will be partners at Linklaters, and they will be joining former Dibb Lupton Alsop insolvency partner Richard Wright, who joined the firm in October and ...

  • Inn the right place

    18-Feb-1997

    Many leading chancery practitioners are still bemoaning the loss of Robert Walker QC, formerly at 5 Stone Buildings, to the bench, and a few confess to being hard-pressed in their quest for outstanding silks. But for the majority, chancery leaders are still to be found in the regular hunting grounds.The sets most frequently mentioned for what is seen as traditional chancery tend to be concentrated in Lincoln's Inn.They include Wilberforce Chambers under ...

  • Investigators probe wrong trouser memo

    18-Feb-1997

    Brian Cleave, the solicitor of the Inland Revenue, is believed to have called in investigators from the Inland Revenue's special compliance office to find who has been circulating notes criticising the length of his trousers.Cleave is the head of the Inland Revenue Solicitor's Office, which has around 50 legal staff on four floors at Somerset House.It is understood that he sent the notes for forensic examination by an outside expert and then called ...

  • Irish government attacks A&L Goodbody on fees

    18-Feb-1997

    A top ranking Irish law firm is refusing to reveal its hourly rates in a clash with the Government over the £3.19m it was awarded in legal fees following a tribunal lasting more than 200 days.A&L Goodbody was awarded the costs by the Taxing Master of the High Court for representing meat processing company Goodman International at the tribunal into the beef industry.But the Government has attacked the fees as excessive and paid just 65 per cent of the bill ...

  • Jones Day continues its London recruitment

    18-Feb-1997

    Steve Fiamma, head of US firm Jones Day Reavis & Pogue in London, has made good on the promise he made in The Lawyer last week to "hire one or two more partners by the end of the year". He has recruited Robert Thomson, formerly a litigation partner with Denton Hall.Thomson, a litigation specialist, will be the sixth partner in the firm's London branch. He deals with large-scale, complex, ...

  • Litigation Disciplinary Tribunals 18/02/97

    18-Feb-1997

    Richard Hillman Vickers, admitted 1969, practising at material time as RH Vickers, Middlesborough, suspended pending compliance with direction of Solicitors Complaints Bureau and ordered to pay £1,332 costs. Allegations substantiated he failed to comply with direction of Complaints Bureau in that he failed to provide up-to-date information about missing deeds.John Michael Davies, 49, admitted 1976, practising at material ...

  • Litigation Personal Injury 18/02/97

    18-Feb-1997

    Lynch v Miles - QB 4 February 1997Claimant: Barry Lynch, Incident: Road traffic accidentInjuries: Claimant escaped from road crash with broken leg, but has been left with serious psychological problems as result of witnessing the death of a pregnant woman during the crash. The dead woman hit the claimant's vehicle head-on after swerving to avoid an on-coming vehicle. The court was told the trauma of the crash eventually led to the breakdown of ...

  • Litigation Recent Decisions 18/02/97

    18-Feb-1997

    Deceased husband's sperm ought not to have been stored without his written consentR v Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority, Ex Parte Blood (1996) Summary: The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990 does not permit any storage of sperm for any purposes unless the donor's consent has been obtained.

  • Litigation Writs 18/02/97

    18-Feb-1997

    Tunbridge Wells widow Sarah Bellingham, whose roofer husband, Andrew, died after falling through a hole in a roof while working at Swindon, Wiltshire in 1995 is suing her husband's former employers, Hathaway Roofing, of Bishops Auckland, County Durham.Writ issued by Dallas Brett, OxfordNykredit Mortgage Bank of Plymouth is suing Colin Knott, Brian Harding and Edward Erdman Group, all of London ...

  • Making Pach work

    18-Feb-1997

    The Bar Council's pupillage clearing system has found itself in the last chance saloon with criticism coming from all quarters. Calls to reform the process have been heard from students and chambers alike, forcing a pledge from the Bar to give more support to the system in the next year. However, if more time had been spent developing Pach at the start, some of the problems which subsequently emerged could have been bypassed.It is good news that the bar ...

  • Malkin Janners damage claim collapses in the Appeal Court

    18-Feb-1997

    A former partner in short-lived City firm Malkin Janners has failed in the Court of Appeal with his claim for damages against 10 of his previous partners, seven years after the firm fell apart.However, Robert Hurst has not ruled out taking the case to the House of Lords, if his current attempts at negotiations fail.He originally launched the action against his 19 other partners after Malkin Janners demerged in 1990, less than a year after it was formed. Eight ...

  • New Devereux head calls for better professional standards

    18-Feb-1997

    Jeffrey Burke QC, the recently elected head of Devereux Chambers, has called for a continuation of the Bar's move towards higher professional standards and competence.Burke, who is replacing Peter Weitzman QC at the head of the set, says continuing to build on a service mentality will be a key policy for the chambers."For the most part I don't think there's a real danger of becoming dictated to by clients or solicitors," ...

  • New Life Up North

    18-Feb-1997

    A barrister's lot in the regions is not always a happy one. One practitioner says: "It is a chicken-and-egg situation. Counsel argue that we do not have to go to London to instruct barristers as they have the necessary expertise, but if no-one instructs the local Bar, how do they get sufficient specialist experience to keep instructions local?"All this may change with the two mercantile courts due to be set up in Newcastle and Leeds in April. The courts have been welcomed ...

  • Nick Braithwaite on the problems faced by UK media in the EU.

    18-Feb-1997

    Nick Braithwaite is a lawyer with Clifford Chance and editor of The International Libel Handbook.When Observer journalist John Sweeney described the millionaire Barclay twins, David and Frederick, as "interesting people with an interesting past", he could never have predicted just how interesting his next year would be.As a result of comments he ...

  • No claim too huge for striking

    18-Feb-1997

    If ever a case served as an argument for the profession to always carry out a full investigation into the possibility of successful striking out moves, it is the recent one involving top accountants Ernst & Young and BCCI.A massive $3.5bn (£2.2bn) claim against Ernst & Young by BCCI's liquidators has been more than halved in what is believed to be the largest claim ever to be struck out at the High Court.The claim against Ernst & Whinney, ...

  • Nut pellets at sea

    18-Feb-1997

    The case of a ruined cargo of ground nut pellets is to go to the Law Lords. They have given leave for an appeal by Linden Management against a $478,000 (£300,000) damages award made by Mr Justice Longmore in the Commercial Court on 29 March 1994 and upheld by the Court of Appeal on 30 January last year in favour of the Effort Shipping. The case centres on a cargo of pellets shipped on the Sonacos, which on arrival in Dominica were said to be infested and subsequently ...

  • One last chance to put Pach back on track

    18-Feb-1997

    John Malpas and Chris Fogarty reportIt is widely acknowledged that 1997 will be the make or break year for the Bar Council's cherished new Pach pupillage clearing house system.Students and chambers alike complain that the first year of Pach was plagued with technical and logistical problems. But although there is widespread recognition that almost anything is better than the traditional free-for-all pupillage selection system which existed before Pach, ...

  • OSS promises investigation

    18-Feb-1997

    The director of the Office for the Supervision of Solicitors, Peter Ross, has promised that the OSS will give full consideration to the British Legal Association's complaint about the perceived mishandling of the Regis computer project.The complaint refers to solicitor members of the Law Society's management board from January 1995 onwards.Ross said: "The complaint will be subject to a thorough investigation to establish the accuracy or otherwise of ...

  • Presenting the case for the prosecution

    18-Feb-1997

    Coverage by The Lawyer of the Law Society's Provision of Information to Council Members missed the point!The objectives of the guidelines are simple: to ensure that Law Society staff respond promptly to enquiries from council members and to provide staff with support and guidance about how to do so.At a council meeting last December, I was directed to take steps to make it clear to staff that any unreasonable lack of openness would be viewed as an issue ...

  • Sayer runs for president

    18-Feb-1997

    After months of attacking the Law Society for financial ineptitude, its deputy treasurer Robert Sayer is now seeking to become its president.In a surprise move, the former president Martin Mears has agreed to stand as Sayer's deputy rather than make a second bid for the presidency, as he was widely expected to do.But there is confusion over who will be the third member of the ticket. Solicitors' Association president Anthony Bogan's name has been ...

  • Scotland shuts in the name of technology

    18-Feb-1997

    Alison Laferla reportsThe Scottish law courts closed for business for two days recently in order to demonstrate live transcript and document image technology to the Scottish legal profession.The series of discussions and demonstrations, which took part in the Supreme Courts, were initiated by Paul Motion, associate at Edinburgh firm Fyfe Ireland. Motion had gained experience of document imaging technology when practising in New Zealand.

  • Simmons casts its network around the globe

    18-Feb-1997

    Simmons & Simmons is networking its offices in London, Paris, Brussels, New York and Hong Kong, linking over 1,250 employees through a common desktop platform.It is thought to be the first law firm to use an international frame relay service so extensively worldwide.The service, which will interconnect local area networks, is designed to support all the firm's email and file transfer applications. It should also be able ...

  • Stars of chancery

    18-Feb-1997

    With the expansion in commercial chancery work, and the heavy hitters from the commercial Bar appearing against the chancery heavyweights, the commercial chancery counsel may be gaining a foothold in both camps.At 3-4 South Square, there is more of an emphasis on liquidation and insolvency work: Michael Crystal QC has his fans as does John Higham QC, and Gabriel Moss QC is "good in court"; Simon Mortimore QC is "good, very helpful", Richard Adkins QC is "very good on paperwork", ...

  • Students suffer as Pach fiasco leaves 300 empty pupillages

    18-Feb-1997

    MORE than 300 pupillages have been left unfilled by the Bar Council's pupillage clearing house system Pach, leading to fears among students that the scheme has dramatically reduced the number of places that are on offer.The Pach scheme was designed to bring order to the annual pupillage free-for-all, but its failure to allocate 320 pupillages has led to claims that it has made things worse.Some chambers have already decided to pull out of the scheme this ...

  • Surveillance prompts Commons debate

    18-Feb-1997

    VETERAN Labour MP Tam Dalyell has tabled a parliamentary question to probe the extent to which lawyers are subjected to surveillance while interviewing defendants in prisons.Dalyell agreed to table the question following an approach by the criminal barrister Jonathan Goldberg QC, head of chambers at Three Temple Gardens, who has discovered that interviews between lawyers and their clients at the high security Belmarsh Prison are monitored by video cameras.The ...

  • Technology seminars

    18-Feb-1997

    Technology for Business is holding seminars to discuss the use of IT within law firms. The company will demonstrate its case management and voice recognition systems on 27 February in London and 20 March in Ipswich.For details of these and other seminars around the UK, call 01932 781120.

  • The Lawyer Inquiry: Hugh Ellins

    18-Feb-1997

    Hugh Ellins was born in Shoreham-on-Sea on 23 October 1945. He now lives in Newbury and is a partner and head of commercial property at Charles Lucas & Marshall. What was your first job?Greengrocer's delivery boy.What was your first-ever salary as a lawyer?£5 per week.What would you have done if you hadn't become a lawyer?Joined the Fleet Air Arm.

  • The Spanish monster prepares for Europe

    18-Feb-1997

    Last year, respected Spanish firm J&A Garrigues invited leading firms across Europe, including Simmons & Simmons from the UK, to mark the 30th year of the Club de Abogados - "the first European club of lawyers" - which the Spanish firm helped set up.But founding partner Antonio Garrigues stresses the "club was set up in May 1966, when integrated European legal networks were completely unheard of."Last week J&A Garrigues announced its merger with Andersen ALT, ...

  • Top earner Davis pulls out of Mishcons equity

    18-Feb-1997

    Mishcon de Reya's biggest biller, banking partner Stephen Davis, is to come out of the firm's equity along with commercial partner David Harvey.Anthony Julius, a Mishcons senior partner, said the two will have consultancy status at the firm. Davis, who is said to bill up to £1.5m a year, is to work two-and-a-half days a week in-house for Austrian bank RZB Austria.

  • Vice-chair election sets precedent for SLFA

    18-Feb-1997

    The Solicitors' Family Law Association is holding its first ever contested election for vice-chair.The candidates are Grant Howell, partner at Charles Russell and chairman of the SFLA training committee, and Rosemary Carter, partner at Cambridge firm Miller & Co and chair of the SFLA mediation committee.Current chair Nigel Shepherd said this was the first time that ...

  • When the glitter fades

    18-Feb-1997

    The pending Chancery Division battle between Johnny Rossall, one-time member of Gary Glitter's original Glitter Band, and his former colleagues who still run the group, ended in the High Court. Rossall appeared before Mr Justice Jacob on 6 February 1997 and, after admitting he had breached a 1984 ban on him using the word 'glitter' in the name of any musical beat/group he was associated with, he was given a 12-month jail sentence, suspended ...

  • Will the media circus make a clown of justice?

    18-Feb-1997

    When lawyers representing murder suspect Tracie Andrews wanted to find new witnesses for their case they called a press conference.Although unusual, the move is part of a noticeable trend. Instead of remaining aloof from the media frenzy surrounding high-profile trials, defence solicitors nowadays join the fray.Mark Stephens, of Stephens Innocent, is well-known for presenting clients to the media in several high-profile cases, including the Taylor sisters and ...