16 September 1996

The Lawyer

  • A hard head and a warm heart

    17-Sep-1996

    What law practitioners are looking for in a family or matrimonial law barrister is the ability to really cut through to the issue as well as the ability to communicate with the clients. They should be able to create a feeling of confidence and come up with a solution without necessarily having to rely on written advice.One leading practitioner in this area also contends that counsel’s abilities have to be broader because the work involves “so many of the aspects of the commercial ...

  • A think-tank is the solution

    17-Sep-1996

    The Law Society has been seen as an easy scapegoat on which to blame the perilous state of the High Street law firm. But the reasons for the problems being faced by many practices are far more complex. Basically too many solicitors are chasing too little work for which they are inadequately qualified.And if the criticism of the society is that it has failed to stop law firms becoming increasingly vulnerable, a moment's thought will confirm that, as a profession, ...

  • A&O boosts cash to local law centre

    17-Sep-1996

    City firm Allen & Overy has announced a substantial increase in the amount of pro bono work and funds which it donates each year to Wandsworth and Merton Law Centre in London.The firm has agreed to provide £15,000 a year and will start to take on in-house pro bono cases in addition to the advice sessions it runs each week in Battersea.Up until now the firm has been ...

  • All clear on the horizon

    17-Sep-1996

    Transfer of public risks to the private sector has become a major component of domestic development policy and is increasingly being used for major projects in developing countries such as the former Eastern Bloc and some Asian nations.But host governments, lenders, investors and developers do not always give proper consideration to environmental matters, and that has led to refusal of funding, withdrawal of political risk insurance cover and substantial compensation costs. ...

  • An advocate of training

    17-Sep-1996

    I was interested to see the Focus article on advocacy training published in The Lawyer 13 August .The College of Law strongly agrees that advocacy can be taught. We have found trainees making the same faults as those listed in your article and we have seen others which Michael Bowes no doubt also will have noticed.In examination-in-chief, for instance, trainees tend to miss details and put questions in an illogical sequence. In cross-examination we ...

  • Brief

    17-Sep-1996

    Ian Walker, vice-president of the Association of Personal Injury Lawyers (Apil), has been elected to the Board of Governors of the Association of Trial Lawyers of America, Apil's US equivalent. Walker, of London firm Russell Jones & Walker, has been elected for a three-year term and will serve with Michael Napier, elected last year as the other UK governor. Walker promised he would "work hard to ensure that the rights of foreign claimants in international multi-party actions proceeding ...

  • Building on firm ground

    17-Sep-1996

    May I respond on behalf of the Law Society and its staff to the charge of no-can-doism levelled at us by Gerald Funnell in his letter in The Lawyer 27 August.If, as was suggested, the society was unhelpful in providing a lead for firms into this area, why did it establish the Solicitors Financial and Property Services Company in 1988 with the objective of giving assistance to solicitors entering into property selling. At the time this company was treated with ...

  • CCBE causes embarrassment

    17-Sep-1996

    European Bar leaders were due last weekend to discuss how to better present themselves, after an embarrassing session at the American Bar Association Conference last month in which they appeared to contradict each other.The session, entitled 'The European Lawyer', and held in Orlando, Florida, was sponsored by the Council of the Bars and Law Societies of the European Community.It featured talks by European bar leaders including Tony Girling, Law Society ...

  • Charles Marquand looks at how regulation 30 aids Crest users.

    17-Sep-1996

    Charles Marquand is a barrister at 3 New Square.Crest, the paperless securities settlements system, went live on 15 July. The system allows shareholders to transfer shares electronically rather than having to use paper transfer forms and certificates.Parties to a bargain can now send "dematerialised instructions" to the "operator" who, in turn, sends an instruction to the relevant company instructing it to register a transfer. ...

  • Cheltenham firm opens window to Legalmind system

    17-Sep-1996

    Admiral Legal Systems has won a contract to supply Legalmind, its latest practice management system, to Cheltenham firm Wiggin and Co.Wiggin and Co, which also has offices in London and Los Angeles, specialises in commercial, tax and media law and litigation.Graham Watts, director of finance at the firm, said he was looking for software that could ...

  • Council clashes with local firm

    17-Sep-1996

    Liverpool City Council has accused a local firm of conniving with a landlord in a bid to maximise housing benefit claims.The council has reported D P Hardy & Co to the Office for the Supervision of Solicitors and the Legal Aid Board, following an aborted judicial review action handled by the firm. It alleges the firm purported to be pursuing the case on behalf of a couple who were not receiving benefit, when in fact it was the landlord who was behind the action.

  • Crash victims line up at Collins

    17-Sep-1996

    A firm of solicitors situated next to the site of last month's Watford Junction train crash has landed a new round of business from injury victims seeking compensation.Collins solicitors, specialists in personal injury and medical negligence, prompted around 20 victims to pursue compensation claims through the firm after 22 turned up to a seminar it held on the implications of the crash earlier this month.One woman died and more than 60 people were injured ...

  • Deadlock over Lockerbie trial

    17-Sep-1996

    The British, German and American governments have deliberately created deadlock over the Lockerbie trial because evidence against the two accused Libyans "would not last five minutes in court", said Jim Swire, father of a Lockerbie victim.In a moving speech at the Lockerbie seminar, Swire asked the lawyers present "to rise up and demand that the course of justice in this case be wrenched out of the hands of politicians. They take no oath to find truth or justice. They have ...

  • DMA and Gordons link

    17-Sep-1996

    Deborah Mills & Associates, specialist in commercial and energy law, is hiving off its property and litigation work so it can concentrate on its energy practice.Under an agreement between it and Gordons, both based in Marlow, Buckinghamshire, DMA will refer litigation and property work to its neighbour.Partners from each firm will act as consultants to the other, and stationery will state that the firms are associated.DMA's litigation partner, ...

  • Doctor in the dock

    17-Sep-1996

    A Somerset woman who claims she suffered a stroke as a result of taking the contraceptive pill, is suing her GP. Philippa Brand will seek a High Court damages from Dr James Buckle of South Petherton, Somerset. She claims she should not have been prescribed the pill because she was 38, overweight, a heavy smoker and had a history of hypertension.

  • DPP:help kids in court

    17-Sep-1996

    The Director of Public Prosecutions, Barbara Mills, has backed calls for national guidelines on the treatmentof children in court to be applied across the criminal justice system.At the launch last week of Children in Court, a report by Victim Support, Mills said there was a clear need for improvement in the way children giving evidence were treated, and called for better co-ordination between parties in the criminal justice system."Mills announced the future ...

  • Firm sues for libel over fax

    17-Sep-1996

    West END solicitors The Grangewoods Partnership is suing another West End law firm for libel damages over an unsigned fax.The Grangewoods Partnership has issued a High Court writ claiming libel damages from the 31-partner Forsyte Saunders Kerman of New Cavendish Street.Grangewoods claims Forsyte sent it a libellous, typewritten, unsigned fax on 23 August.Neither firm would comment on the action.

  • Flotations

    17-Sep-1996

    Taylor Johnson Garrett acted for Barbican Healthcare in its application for admission to AIM

  • Flotations

    17-Sep-1996

    Herbert Smith acted for Lazard Capital Markets in relation to the secondary listing by way of introduction of Stolt-Neilsen SA's class B shares on the London Stock Exchange.The market capitalisation was approximately £350 million. White & Case acted for Stolt-Neilsen.

  • Herbert Smith wins electricity contract

    17-Sep-1996

    City firm Herbert Smith has won the contract against two other firms to advise the 14 electricity companies of England, Wales and Scotland on implementing full competition in 19 months time.Business customers of the privatised electricity companies are already able to choose their supplier, but from 1 April 1998 all 23 million individual customers must be given the same choice.Herbert Smith energy partner Mark Newbery, who will lead the team, said: "Immensely ...

  • Honeyman Brown:Alsops' merger mastermind

    17-Sep-1996

    When Christopher Honeyman Brown was appointed chief executive of Liverpool-based Alsop Wilkinson five months ago, he vowed to leave no stone unturned in his review of operations.But there were few who could have foreseen that within four months he would be arranging the details for what amounts to a takeover.In the Dibb Lupton Broomhead "merger" with Alsops, all the senior staff of Dibbs will be in charge, Nigel Knowles will be managing partner, with Robin Smith ...

  • Illegality proves no defence

    17-Sep-1996

    Faced with a claim involving payment for advertising telephone sex lines, Appeal Court judge Lord Justice Brown decided to append as the last page of his judgment a full-colour page of the advertisements at the centre of the case which depicted naked women and included highly suggestive copy.This aspect of Armhouse Lee Ltd v Chappell & anr alone makes it a remarkable addition to the law libraries at the Royal Courts of Justice. But the subject of the case was no less ...

  • In brief: David Wallen settles action

    17-Sep-1996

    David Wallen, a solicitor who, until last November, was a partner in Robin Thompson & Partners, has settled his libel action against the Birmingham Post. The paper had alleged that Wallen had assaulted the husband of his opponent, a litigant in person, after a hearing at Birmingham County Court, aggravating his stomach abscess and causing him to seek hospital treatment. The Birmingham Post accepted that such an allegation had no substance and apologised in court on 12 September for ...

  • In brief: Heaps is sole Brit invited to US conference

    17-Sep-1996

    John Heaps, head of commercial litigation in Evershed's Leeds office, was the only British lawyer invited to speak at a US conference in Washington DC last week. At the event, entitled "Civil Justice and the Litigation Process", Heaps explained aspects of the British legal system, highlighting reforms in the wake of the Woolf Report, particularly changing rules of discovery. The conference was sponsored by the Federalist Society for Law and Public Policy Studies, and up to 200 ...

  • In brief: Heptonstalls moves in to medical law

    17-Sep-1996

    East Yorkshire solicitors Heptonstalls has established a medical law department, headed by partner John Burman. A nurse will be employed to assist on medical issues and help manage medical case records. Burman serves on the Law Society Medical Negligence Panel.

  • In brief: LCD consults over hearsay evidence

    17-Sep-1996

    Lawyers are being consulted on how hearsay evidence should be introduced into civil proceedings in England and Wales. Recipients of a paper distributed by The Lord Chancellor's Department are asked if there should be time limits on a party's request for the oral evidence of hearsay, and how developments in computer evidence should be introduced to the courts. The LCD hopes to introduce the Act, which was passed last year, by November.

  • In brief: Museum appoints Halliwell Landau

    17-Sep-1996

    Manchester-based Halliwell Landau has been appointed legal adviser to the Museum of Science and Industry in Manchester. "Halliwell Landau was chosen to provide all legal services to the museum in view of the firm's breadth of expertise and commitment to service," said museum director Patrick Greene. Halliwell partner Geoffrey Shindler will lead the legal team assisted by Anne Taylor, another partner and head of pensions for the firm. "This is an extremely interesting and high profile ...

  • In brief: Robinson joins Fennemores team

    17-Sep-1996

    Fennemores has appointed Chris Robinson to join the commercial team in its Milton Keynes office. He will be responsible for corporate finance, and acquisitions and mergers. Robinson joins the firm from Irwin Mitchell in Birmingham where he was head of corporate services. He decided to move to Fennemores because of the growth in corporate finance in the Milton Keynes area.

  • In brief: Three new litigators for Lee Crowder

    17-Sep-1996

    Birmingham firm Lee Crowder has appointed three new solicitors to its litigation department. Employment specialist Richard Whittington has joined the firm as an associate from Hobson Audley in London; insolvency specialist Alias Dass has been recruited from Birmingham firm Herbert Wilkes; and Robert Holland has transferred from Edge & Ellison, also in Birmingham. Head of litigation Bernard Singleton said: "We are delighted with the growth of the department, which is in response to the ...

  • In brief: Timothy Lloyd QC moves up to High Court

    17-Sep-1996

    The head of 11 Old Square Chambers, Timothy Lloyd QC, will take up his appointment as a High Court judge in the Chancery division next month. Lloyd was called to the Bar by the Middle Temple in 1970 and became a bencher in 1994. He took silk in 1986 and is approved to sit as a deputy High Court judge. He is a Chancery practitioner and specialises in land law, corporate law and trusts. A spokesman from 11 Old Square confirmed that the new head of chambers will be either Jonathan Simpkiss ...

  • Israeli lawyer talks of peace go-ahead

    17-Sep-1996

    The Israeli-Palestinian peace process will not be stalled by the apparently hawkish new right wing Likud government of Israel, said the lawyer who brokered peace with the PLO.Joel Singer, who conducted the secret Oslo negotiations with PLO officials and drafted the resulting historic agreement on self-government for Palestinians, was speaking at the launch of the British Israel Law Association at the Law Society Hall last week.He said that since Rabin was assassinated ...

  • Judge dismisses barrister's race case as vexatious

    17-Sep-1996

    A BARRISTER'S allegations that a set of chambers subjected her to a campaign of racial discrimination have been described variously as as "scandalous, frivolous or vexatious" by a county court judge.At Central London County Court last week, Judge Quentin Edwards QC struck out Joy Okoye's action against her former set, Staple Inn Chambers.Okoye, who has pledged to launch an appeal, was attempting to become the first barrister ever to bring a racial discrimination ...

  • LAB stung by threat of advice boycott

    17-Sep-1996

    THE LEGAL Aid Board has moved to quell a rebellion by advice agencies over legal aid block contracting, putting down a threatened boycott of the scheme to a "widespread misunderstanding" of the government's reform plans.The threat was made last week when the Federation of Independent Advice Centres (FIAC) warned that its centres would pull out of block contracting if they were required to collect charges from their clients.Extending legal aid to advice agencies ...

  • Last Cawthra helpline will advise on holiday disasters

    17-Sep-1996

    Bradford firm Last Cawthra Feather has set up a holiday complaints helpline to cater for the flood of enquiries that occur at the end of each summer.The aim is to give quick advice to holiday makers who believe they have a claim and then send out a questionnaire in order to identify it.Neil Shaw, a partner in the firm's litigation department and Geoff Lee, a personal injury litigator, will be on hand to deal with enquiries.They say they are equipped ...

  • Lawyers forge Lockerbie plan

    17-Sep-1996

    Leading lawyers have hammered out a plan that could end the stalemate blocking the trial of the two Libyans accused of the Lockerbie bombing.The Libyans are refusing to leave their country because they do not believe they would get a fair trial in the US and the UK, but say they would accept a trial in a neutral location such as the Hague in the Netherlands. The UK and US governments insist on a trial in their jurisdictions.Gerard Brown, a criminal lawyer and ...

  • Litigation Disciplinary Tribunals 17/09/96

    17-Sep-1996

    Andrew Mark Jones, 31, admitted 1989, practising at material times as assistant solicitor with Toller Hales & Colcutt, Northampton, struck off and ordered to pay £548 costs. Allegations substantiated he wrongly drew and used client money. Tribunal told that Jones had misused at least £11,241 from his firm's client bank account for the benefit of unrelated clients. Tribunal said it accepted he had been under considerable stress.

  • Litigation Recent Decisions 17/09/96

    17-Sep-1996

    Providing hairdressing services in the ECMinistere Public v Aubertin Joined Cases C-29-35/94 (1996).CJEC (Fourth Chamber)Summary: Validity of French law requiring hairdressers to have diplomas if they are French but permitting hairdressers from other member states to operate salons without diplomas.Reference to the European Court of Justice concerning two French citizens who were operating hairdressing salons without possessing the qualifications ...

  • Litigation Writs 17/09/96

    17-Sep-1996

    A man who was hit by a car last June after he fell into the road following a row outside a pub, is suing the driver of the vehicle, Scott Mills, of Collier Row, Essex, for damages. Andrew Hurrell, 33, who spent three weeks in hospital and is permanently incapacitated by nerve damage to his face, accuses Mills of negligence.Writ issued by Ashley Wilson, London SW3.A woman who suffered a series of heart attacks ...

  • Lockerbie. When the rule book is thrown out

    17-Sep-1996

    It is a cliche of modern life that when events of great significance occur, people remember where they were or what they were doing when the news broke.My first experience of this was the freezing November night when I heard of the assassination of President Kennedy. I was nine. More examples followed: man landed on the moon (on holiday on the Isle of Iona), President Nixon resigned (nightshift at a vegetable packing factory).And then the evening of 21 December ...

  • Marketing. Competing for business

    17-Sep-1996

    Crash of Pan Am flight 103: those accused of the bombing faced trial by mediaWith conveyancing still cut-throat and legal aid cases a less-than-reliable source of profitable fees, commercial work has become the life-saver of many small and medium-sized practices.Lawyers could learn much from chartered accountants, who over the last decade have become the "advisers of choice" for business while lawyers have been relegated largely to carrying out transactions - ...

  • Mears stalks Girling with 'mistakes' dossier

    17-Sep-1996

    As Tony Girling chairs his first Law Society Council meeting as president this week, it emerged that Martin Mears, his ousted predecessor on the council, is busily preparing a dossier of his mistakes.Mears has told friends that he is compiling a critique of Girling's presidential term of office, to be made public just before the next presidential election.When Girling was elected, Mears promised to remain on the council and pledged to contest next year's ...

  • Morgans targets drugs field

    17-Sep-1996

    London and south Wales firm Morgan Bruce is cashing in on its health service connections by launching a specialist service for the drugs industry.The service is based at the practice's Fleet Street office and is headed by its new partner and pharmaceutical law specialist Anthony Warnock-Smith.Warnock-Smith has joined the practice from Sanofi Winthrop, the UK arm of French healthcare and beauty firm Sanofi. Morgan Bruce has been retained by Sanofis to provide ...

  • Nat West opens legal centre

    17-Sep-1996

    BARRISTERS and their chambers are being targeted by a new legal banking centre set up by National Westminster Bank.The Law Courts Legal Centre has been established at the National Westminster Bank branch opposite the Royal Courts of Justice in The Strand.A section of the bank has been set aside for the centre, which will cater purely for barristers and solicitors.The bank has 45 sets of chambers on its books plus 1,000 barristers and 1,000 solicitors.

  • New CBA directory planned

    17-Sep-1996

    John Malpas reportsPLANS to publish a directory of specialist criminal barristers have been unveiled by the Criminal Bar Association (CBA).The association, which has more than 2,000 members, hopes to publish its new directory at the beginning of next year.The directory will contain details of all the association's members as well as sets of chambers containing or more criminal practitioners who are members of the CBA.

  • No more admin for SEG, says Law Soc

    17-Sep-1996

    The Law Society is proposing to stop minute-taking and running the membership list for the Solicitors European Group."The SEG is in an anomalous position," said Jonathan Goldsmith, the society's international head, pointing out that administrative support is normally only provided to groups that have difficulty gaining access to the profession, such as women, the young and the disabled.He continued: "The SEG is really a special interest group like the Legal ...

  • Nortons denies problems as eight quit property dept

    17-Sep-1996

    THE COMMERCIAL Property Department at City firm Norton Rose has been hit by a rash of defections among its senior assistant solicitor ranks.In the past few months, five of the department's high ranking assistants have left to join other firms, with one of them joining as a partner.Three juniors have also handed in their notice recently, making a total of eight departures ...

  • Planning and flexibility: keys to Europe

    17-Sep-1996

    Flexibility and sound planning are vital to doing business in Europe, according to participants at the American Corporate Counsel Association (ACCA) European Chapter conference held in Brussels earlier this month.Despite the depiction by Europhiles of the EC as a unified single entity, the conference highlighted significant barriers to cross-border business, such as lack of harmonised company and fiscal laws, the stalling (over employee integration) of ...

  • Property

    17-Sep-1996

    Denton Hall advised Dutch development company MAB on the sale of Arcades shopping Centre, Lancashire, for £35 million. The centre, the first of a number of UK developments for MAB, was purchased by CGI, a German open-ended fund. CGI was advised by Linklaters & Paines.

  • Ready for change

    17-Sep-1996

    Barristers practising in the field of family Law may be forgiven for thinking they have become insufficiently appreciated over the last year, wondering if the family Bar might go the way of the defended divorce.For over two decades, the family Bar has flourished. The scarcely justifiable clockwork routine work of undefendeds at £12.50 for five unopposed minutes became the lawyerless rubber stamp of the special procedure decree. In its place new and real work sprang ...

  • Royal tussle

    17-Sep-1996

    The High Court is set to become the stage for a battle between two wealthy Arab rulers. Sheikh Khalifa bin Hamed al-Thani and his father, Sheikh Hamed bin Khalifa al-Thani, are reported to be on course for a major courtroom confrontation in London over billions of dollars of state money which Sheik Hamed claims his father, who he deposed as ruler of Qatar in 1995, misappropriated. One aspect of the case which will raise major legal questions is the status of Sheikh ...

  • Security workshop

    17-Sep-1996

    "Internet Security for Lawyers" is a one-day workshop being organised by First Base. Topics covered include firewalls, encryption, personnel security and the risks of using the Internet. Speakers include Nigel Miller, of Fox Williams. Each delegate will receive a free copy of Internet Firewalls & Network Security and a conference pack. The workshop costs £195 plus VAT ...

  • Simmons pair chosen to teach eco law to Russians

    17-Sep-1996

    Simmons & Simmons environmental law partner Stephen Tromans and associate James Fitzgerald are to fly to Russia in October and November to train its government lawyers in international environmental law.The Russian Federation is reviewing its environmental legislation in order to try to make it compatible with EC and international environmental law. As part of this project, it has asked for western lawyers to give advice.Simmons & Simmons formed a team with US ...

  • Small group with big plans for reform

    17-Sep-1996

    Sir Nicholas Lyell was among a small group of demonstrators outside the Royal Courts of Justice last Wednesday. He was not the Attorney-General but a man who changed his name to mark his frustration at having a vexatious litigant order issued against him. Like the others, he was there to register his discontent with the British legal system.The demonstrators were all members of the newly-formed Campaign for a Fair Hearing, an umbrella organisation for human rights groups ...

  • Speed up complaint process, warns broadcast watchdog

    17-Sep-1996

    THE BROADCASTING watchdog has warned solicitors instructed to draft complaints on behalf of clients to speed up their acts.The Broadcasting Complaints Commission has revealed that members of the public who believe they are increasing their chances of a successful complaint by paying a solicitor are in fact achieving the opposite result.It points out that the time limits it operates under are considerably tighter than those adopted by the courts, and that solicitors ...

  • Suppliers blast Law Society IT directory

    17-Sep-1996

    Alison Laferla reportsLegal IT suppliers, angry at being excluded from the Law Society's IT directory, have accused the society of doing its members a disservice by failing to carry out research for the directory properly.The Information Technology Directory, published in August, is sold to members for £35. It aims to "provide guidance on how to choose and set up an IT system and contains information provided by the main IT ...

  • The best of the up-and-coming

    17-Sep-1996

    One family law solicitor explains that because of the personal and subjective aspects involved in family law, solicitors in this area tend to return to the "tried and tested" counsel. This is the case for both leaders and juniors, as well as the chambers which are used.Again it is mainly the sets wit the most frequently instructed silks which also house the up-and-coming juniors.At Bedford Row Chambers, there is a whole raft of junior counsel singled out for ...

  • The Lawyer Inquiry: Peter Watson

    17-Sep-1996

    Peter Watson was born in Greenock, Scotland, on 22 January 1954. He now lives in Glasgow and is a solicitor advocate at Levy & McRae. What was your first job?Delivering newspapers as a schoolboy.What was your first ever salary as a lawyer?£2,400 per annum.What would you have done if you hadn't become a lawyer?A presenter for a 'wine' programme.

  • The most fun a silk can have

    17-Sep-1996

    An aptitude for Latin at school is what led Elizabeth Lawson into law. It was the only subject she was good at, and her teacher had said that the only profession it was really any use for is law. Lawson adds: "That is quite untrue, of course."She also explains that one of the reasons why she chose the Bar rather than the solicitor's side of the profession "is probably a sign of the actor manque". She admits there are aspects of a solicitor's ...

  • The northern lights

    17-Sep-1996

    Family and matrimonial law is an area on which the local regional Bar is often consulted. Although many family and matrimonial lawyers have been building up specialist expertise in this area of practice themselves, including qualifying as solicitor advocates, they still tend to use counsel for the more complex matters or where "pure advocacy" is needed.Many solicitors cite the expense of using counsel as one reason why they have built up experience in childcare matters. ...

  • The rising stars of the regions

    17-Sep-1996

    The regions have not been ignored by solicitors in their recommendations of up-and-coming juniors in family and matrimonial matters. It is a field that needs, as one solicitor says, "someone who is superb with clients, very understanding and able to smooth things over with the clients, as well as fighting in their corner".In Birmingham, some consider Robin Rowland at 1 Fountain Court and Patricia Deeley, head of chambers at Priory Chambers, 2 Fountain Court, as "by far the ...

  • There's no time to sit on the sidelines

    17-Sep-1996

    The merger of Dibb Lupton and Alsop Wilkinson has created ripples among law firms more for its novelty factor than for the perceived impact of such a merger on the profession.While there are obvious benefits for both firms, the major rationale would seem to be size. Most firms may be blase about its significance, but such a link-up will, nonetheless, cause food for thought for medium-sized practices.Once again they will wonder about the direction ...

  • Top solicitors join Bar

    17-Sep-1996

    TWO high-profile solicitors from very different legal fields have joined well-known chambers after deciding to transfer to the Bar.Stephen Cragg, the Public Law Project's most senior solicitor, and Linklaters & Paines partner James Flynn are the latest solicitor converts to the Bar.Cragg has taken up a pupillage at the civil liberties set 2 Garden Court while Flynn, ...

  • Trademark dispute gets a local helping hand

    17-Sep-1996

    When it comes to intellectual property disputes, companies invariably choose one of the major London specialists.In one pending High Court action, however, northern company Defender Security Systems has sought legal advice from a firm on its own doorstep.Solicitor Jonathan Armstrong, a member of the fast-expanding IP department at Keeble Hawson Rodgers & Howe in Leeds, has been called in to handle the case.He said that although ...

  • UK govt accused of delay over world criminal court

    17-Sep-1996

    The UK government is dragging its heels on establishing an international criminal court, said one of the leading lawyers involved in its establishment.Cherif Bassiouni, vice-chairman of the UN committee charged with setting up an international criminal court, told the Lockerbie conference: "A number of governments, including the UK, are not very favourable to the idea and are trying to delay it as much as possible."The (UN) General Assembly has mandated my committee ...

  • Web site for ILCA

    17-Sep-1996

    The Institute of Legal Cashiers & Administrators is now on the Web at http://www. cloudnine.co.uk/cloudnine/ilca home.htm. The site contains a register of job vacancies, details of training programmes and an advice service.

  • Wine and dine MPs, says Law Society

    17-Sep-1996

    Solicitors are being encouraged to take their local MPs out to lunch as part of an initiative to turn lawyers into successful parliamentary lobbyists.Addressing a mini conference "Getting the best out of Government", organised by the South West regional office of the Law Society, Chris Philipsborn, the Law Society's parliamentary officer, said effective local lobbying was crucial to the society's efforts to raise its profile in Parliament.But he said ...