12 August 1996

The Lawyer

  • 'We are united by a sense of outrage'

    13-Aug-1996

    AN August calm has descended on the legal aid debate, putting on hold what promises to become the burning issue of the autumn months.However, behind the scenes, a nationwide campaign to defeat the Lord Chancellor's plan for wholesale reform of legal aid is taking shape.Organisations concerned about the White Paper on legal aid are using the summer months to digest its implications and prepare for the next parliamentary session. And one group in particular ...

  • £90,000 solicitor bill not paid

    13-Aug-1996

    Helen Sage reportsSouth Herefordshire District Council is embroiled in a row with the district auditor's office over an unpaid solicitor's bill of about £90,000.The sum, which is owed by the council to sole practitioner David Barry, includes solicitor fees, counsel fees and agent fees for representing members of a Ross-on-Wye Sports Centre Association in a High Court case.Barry was asked in 1992 to represent the ...

  • ...and the firm fans

    13-Aug-1996

    From every point of view, the recent proposals unveiled by Aclec would, if adopted unamended, completely change the process of preparation for a career in both branches of the legal profession. However, these proposals could prove to be of value to law firms.Undergraduate educationCurrently, every law student looking to enter the profession must study the 'Seven Foundations of Legal Knowledge', despite universities finding that the ever-increasing ...

  • A helping hand for the disabled

    13-Aug-1996

    The problems and frustrations that arise when the law is called in to help those who cannot help themselves have seldom been better illustrated than in a recent High Court action.And one message comes from the winning legal team - lawyers who fight for the needs of the ill and disabled must be tough and "keep on the backs of the social services".The case centred on a critically disabled man and his mother's fight to get him more help. Her continuing ...

  • Aclec - the academic angst...

    13-Aug-1996

    In April this year, the Advisory Committee on Legal Education and Conduct (Aclec) published its First Report on Legal Education and Training, stating its intention to stimulate debate rather than to set out a blueprint for change.If nothing else, the committee achieved its intention - its radical proposals sparked widely diverging views from leading academics. The report's main proposals include:a minimum of two years study of legal subjects ...

  • Agriculture ace feels pull of home

    13-Aug-1996

    Birmingham firm Shakespeares is looking to recruit a new head for its agricultural law unit following the departure of Nigel Davis.Davis, a leading agricultural lawyer and founder member of the AgriLaw group of specialist lawyers, left Shakespeares to join East Midlands firm Roythorne & Co at the start of this month.Andrew Argyle, managing partner of Shakespeares, said the current plan was to replace Davis with a lawyer of similar calibre. The unit is left with ...

  • Arbitration the solution?

    13-Aug-1996

    Michael Zander (The Times 6 August) is wise to question the feasibility of Lord Woolf's proposals. Although it is a truism to say that the legal issues and evidence in "low value" cases can be just as complex and troubling to resolve and obtain as in 'high value' cases, the real issue is: who pays for civil justice? Society, litigants, practising lawyers, or a combination of all three?Imposing artificially brief time limits or ...

  • Big three top takeovers table

    13-Aug-1996

    THE BIG three City law firms are still at the top of the league for takeover advice work, but challengers are threatening to overhaul them.Acquisitions Monthly magazine's latest league table on takeover advisory work places Linklaters & Paines, Slaughter and May and Freshfields in the first three ...

  • Birmingham four go next door

    13-Aug-1996

    John Malpas reportsA BIRMINGHAM set has been hit by the defection of a quartet of criminal barristers, including one of its most senior tenants.The barristers, led by Stephen Thomas, have moved from 8 Fountain Court to its neighbour 7 Fountain Court.The defection follows the recent death of 8 Fountain Court's long-standing head of chambers John Royer.It is understood Thomas, who was called to the Bar in 1980, ...

  • Bogan didn't stop Mears

    13-Aug-1996

    It has been suggested by some solicitors that the intervention of Mr Anthony Bogan in the presidential elections affected Mr Mears' prospects of victory.The voting figures were:Anthony Bogan: 1,288Martin Mears: 14,239Mears/Bogan total: 15,527Anthony Girling: 15,911Difference: 384Messrs Mears and Girling do not support Mr Bogan on the important matter of ...

  • Call for Scots-style housing groups

    13-Aug-1996

    THE LAW Society faces calls from over 150 solicitors' practices to follow the success of Scottish solicitors in reclaiming the housing market by setting up joint property groups.But the prospect of any English scheme could be threatened by a Monopolies and Mergers Commission investigation into the Scottish groups after complaints from estate agents of unfair practices.Glasgow Solicitors Property Group is the latest success story north of the border, uniting ...

  • Clerk retires after half century

    13-Aug-1996

    A LONG-STANDING senior clerk who joined his first set of chambers at the age of 14, at the end of World War II, has announced his retirement.Gordon Breadmore has stood down as senior clerk from Gray's Inn Chambers, the specialist family set led by Brian Jubb.Breadmore started out at the libel chambers 1 Brick Court before moving to 2 Paper Buildings, where he was clerk for 30 years.In 1989 he played a pivotal role in setting ...

  • Client chequebook scheme for firms

    13-Aug-1996

    The Royal Bank of Scotland has launched a banking service which it hopes will transform the way lawyers deal with private client finance.In an attempt to steal a march on the competition, the bank is targeting top law firms with a computerised system, Roybank, that allows lawyers to create and manage bank accounts for their clients.The system allows users to create different types of account and transfer money electronically.Products such as chequebooks ...

  • Council's ABA task

    13-Aug-1996

    John Malpas reportsA drive to hammer home to American lawyers the difference between barristers and solicitors formed the centrepiece of the Bar Council's mission to the premier legal conference in the US. Bar Council chair David Penry-Davey QC led the Bar's delegation to last week's American Bar Association conference in Orlando. He was joined on the trip by vice chair Robert Owen QC, former Bar chair Peter Goldsmith QC and several other senior barristers.

  • Court bans children over security fear

    13-Aug-1996

    A clerk at Oldham Magistrates' Court has banned children from the court's buildings because of worries about security.In a move believed to be the first of its kind, the clerk to the court introduced a ban on children in the courtrooms and concourse last week.The clerk and chief executive, Kathleen Johnson, said that the increasing number of small children brought to court caused tension and adversely affected security. They also witnessed unpleasant ...

  • Court limbers up for action

    13-Aug-1996

    Sheffield man George Piper has launched a damages claim against US-based artificial limb makers Howmedica, and Howmedica International, of Sandwich, Kent, over a replacement hip he received and which he claims was defective. He is suing under the provisions of the Consumer Protection Act.

  • Curtains for combative divorcees

    13-Aug-1996

    Lord Woolf has criticised lawyers from both sides of a divorce proceedings for becoming so combative that the husband's side tried to get the wife committed to prison for not giving back his curtains.The Court of Appeal heard how the former husband's solicitor, Portsmouth sole-practitioner Gregory Challenor, had alleged a court order for the return of a hob, a washing line and curtains had not been obeyed.A summons was even issued for the judge who ...

  • Dismay as Govt refuses to move on murder sentences

    13-Aug-1996

    Criminal lawyers are disappointed by the Government's refusal to change the Home Secretary's powers of regulating life sentences.In response to the Home Affairs Select Committee report on the mandatory life sentence for murder, the Government has rejected a recommendation the Home Secretary's role in setting the tariff and deciding release should be removed.The Government argues that such a measure would reduce public confidence in the criminal ...

  • EC takeover directive meets opposition

    13-Aug-1996

    The latest EC proposal for a framework directive on takeovers consists of a set of principles and requirements which member states will be expected to implement according to their national practices.In the UK, takeover regulation is governed by the Panel on Takeovers and Mergers, a non-statutory body which issues and administers the City code, a framework for the regulation of takeovers.The panel was set up in 1968. It believes that effective regulation of takeovers ...

  • Eversheds entangled in PI row

    13-Aug-1996

    A CONTROVERSIAL network of personal injury firms has reacted furiously to a claim by national law firm Eversheds that a campaign to target potential workplace asthma claimants was "blatant ambulance chasing and utterly irresponsible".The Allied Lawyers Response Team (Alert) has accused Eversheds, which made the claims in a press release to the insurance media, of publishing "self-serving ...

  • Fears of accident exploitation rise

    13-Aug-1996

    ALLEGATIONS that victims of motor accidents are being exploited by a growing number of unscrupulous solicitors are to be put to the Law Society this week.Members of the Motor Accident Solicitors Society (Mass) and the Motoring Uninsured Loss Recoveries Association (Mulra) are to meet Chancery Lane officials to discuss fears that solicitors are losing sight of their clients' needs in the rush to get business.Traditionally, motorists have relied on legal expenses ...

  • Financings

    13-Aug-1996

    Manches & Co advised a consortium led by London & International Projects on its investment in Greenwich Metal Company which was formed to acquire scrap metal business in Greenwich.

  • Financings

    13-Aug-1996

    Berwin Leighton advised Close Brothers Corporate Finance on its appointment to approve the contents of an offer document issued by Liberian Ore

  • Firm's sponsorship scheme under fire

    13-Aug-1996

    AN AMBITIOUS corporate sponsorship scheme for polo matches being promoted by East Anglian firm Mills & Reeve has been questioned by tax analysts Allenbridge.The £5 million contracted exit EIS Polo Scheme sells licences for polo matches and tournaments at Ascot Park so investors can get a return from sponsorship and media rights as well as substantial tax relief.But ...

  • First appointments made following creation of unitary local authorities

    13-Aug-1996

    Helen Sage reportsThe first round of legal appointments have taken place following the reorganisation of Avon, Humberside and Cleveland local authorities, and Scotland and Wales, into unitary councils earlier this year.Bassetlaw District Council in Nottinghamshire is looking for a new head of legal services following the departure of present head Jeffrey Godfrey to the newly created South Gloucestershire Council.Godfrey who joined Bassetlaw ...

  • First lady lauded at dinner

    13-Aug-1996

    Much-criticised US first lady Hillary Clinton received a rapturous welcome from the ABA at its Florida convention.Speaking at the Fellows of the Young Lawyers dinner, where she was awarded for her work on children's rights, she made a strong plea for the retention of government funding for the Legal Services Corporation (LSC), the country's only body which ensures free access to justice for the poor.Leading Republicans in the House of Representatives ...

  • Flotations

    13-Aug-1996

    Olswang acted for personal telephone numbers sales company Life Numbers in its successful application for a listing of ordinary shares and warrants on the Alternative Investment Market of the London Stock Exchange. The company placed 2.5 million units to raise £600,000.

  • Fury at 'UK' session held without Scots

    13-Aug-1996

    Furious Scottish solicitors have attacked the Law Society of England and Wales for holding a seminar labelled "a joint UK/US session" without their participation.The session, held at the ABA conference, was co-chaired by Tony Girling and had senior City solicitors speaking on the business issues of practising in Europe. It was jointly sponsored by the Law Society and the ABA's International Law and Practice Section.At two conference functions organised by ...

  • Girling: 'Firms should sell shares'

    13-Aug-1996

    Law Society president Tony Girling and senior Chancery Lane staff have called for measures to allow law firms to raise cash by selling shares on the stock market in a bid to compete with accountancy firms.Girling promoted the idea at the American Bar Association's Orlando conference.But many of the international Bar leaders reacted angrily, saying it would lead to a loss of independence for lawyers.The new president also told his continental ...

  • Guidelines undermine right to vote of homeless

    13-Aug-1996

    CAMPAIGNERS for the homeless and civil liberties claim new Home Office guidelines on voting rights leave thousands of homeless people disenfranchised.The guidelines insist eligibility to vote depends on residence at a specified address.But the Housing Campaign for Single People (Char) and Liberty say this ignores a recent judgment in favour of a man who used a day centre for meals and as a postal address but did not sleep there."The law accommodates ...

  • Guru predicts demise of firms using hourly billing

    13-Aug-1996

    Law firms which refuse to consider alternatives to hourly billing will end up 'dodos', billing guru Richard Reed told a seminar of US lawyers.Speaking at the ABA convention Reed revealed that 78 per cent of US firms surveyed last year were looking at introducing alternative billing methods. He said: "Firms that are following the old ideas about hourly billing, thinking the recession that brought the alternatives about is a passing phase, will become the dodos of ...

  • Heald Nickinson duo enter insolvency arrangements

    13-Aug-1996

    Two partners at Milton Keynes firm Heald Nickinson have entered into individual voluntary arrangements, but they say they have revitalised the firm's fortunes by bringing in fresh blood.Tim Roberts and Gareth Pobjoy, as well as former senior partner Richard Swan, who has since left the firm, entered into individual voluntary arrangements in May because of financial difficulties.The firm was saved when its assets were bought by two other solicitors - Patrick ...

  • Hi-tech trainers

    13-Aug-1996

    About two years ago, we decided to completely change the computer hardware, operating systems and applications across our firm. Basic technology we now take for granted, such as the mouse, was unfamiliar to many staff and the training team was confronted with the huge task of training 2,000 people worldwide in 15 months. Although there were some professional trainers, most of the team was seconded from within the firm, and included secretaries and ...

  • In brief: Allen & Overy

    13-Aug-1996

    A headline saying "Allen & Overy pulls out of Budapest office" in last week's issue was not meant to convey the impression that Allen & Overy was closing in Budapest. As was made clear in the text of the story, the firm will retain an office in the city.

  • In brief: Bakers partner returns from Hungary

    13-Aug-1996

    Baker & McKenzie partner Peter Magyar has returned to London after eight years overseeing rapid privatisation programmes in Hungary. Magyar, whose Hungarian parents left the country in 1956, the year the USSR crushed the Hungarian uprising, set up Baker & McKenzie's Budapest-based securities and privatisation practice in 1988. He was lead partner on huge deals including privatisation of ...

  • In brief: Bankrupt Bryan owes Penningtons £10,000

    13-Aug-1996

    John Bryan, former financial adviser to the Duchess of York, has been declared bankrupt, and owes £9,487 to City law firm Penningtons. A bankruptcy order issued at the High Court in London gave Bryan 21 days to detail bank accounts and other financial affairs to meet debts totalling £60,000.

  • In brief: Five in Cardiff medical negligence move

    13-Aug-1996

    Edwards Geldard has expanded the medical negligence arm at its Cardiff office to meet increasing demand. Anthony Barnett and Mari Rosser have joined from neighbouring firm Robertsons along with three support staff. Barnett, a solicitor for 36 years, began concentrating on medical negligence cases 12 years ago after winning substantial damages for the family of a spastic quadriplegic asphyxiated at birth.

  • In brief: Free investment managers leaflets

    13-Aug-1996

    The Association of Solicitor Investment Managers is giving away free copies of its training leaflets and its members directory. For copies of the directory, call 01892 870065.

  • In brief: LawNet and Sifa co-operation move

    13-Aug-1996

    National law firm network LawNet has completed a mutual co-operation agreement with Solicitors for Independent Financial Advice. Under the agreement, the two organisations will work together to develop new projects and promote the development offinancial services. Sifa, the law firm financial services network, will give free training to members of LawNet.

  • In brief: MacRoberts does most deals in Scotland

    13-Aug-1996

    A Scottish business magazine has named MacRoberts as top legal adviser in Scotland by value of deals done. The firm completed deals totalling £1.4 billion in the past six months to win the accolade from Scottish Business Insider, which surveyed lawyers, accountants and banks.

  • In brief: Racial discrimination in justice system

    13-Aug-1996

    Racial discrimination is still widespread in the criminal justice system, according to a joint study by the National Association of Probation Officers and the Association of Black Probation Officers. The report reveals that black people are markedly under-represented as employees in all agencies, except the CPS and the probation services. There are no black High Court judges, Justices Clerks or Chief Probation Officers.

  • In brief: Rowe & Maw appoints transport specialist

    13-Aug-1996

    City firm Rowe & Maw has appointed Mark Henrick, formerly of McKennas, as a partner in its corporate finance team. Henrick who had been a partner in McKennas since 1992 has joined Rowe & Maw as a specialist in the transport sector. He will provide corporate and asset financing support for Rowe & Maw's aviation practice. His appointment follows the arrival of Christopher Causer, who recently joined Rowe & Maw from Lovell White Durrant as a specialist in private finance initiatives, ...

  • In brief: UK-Canada swap by Stikeman Elliott

    13-Aug-1996

    Stuart Cobbett is moving from Canadian barristers and solicitors Stikeman Elliott's Montreal headquarters to head the firm's City-based operation from 1 September. Cobbett takes over from Calin Rovinescu who returns to Canada to become the firm's managing partner. Cobbett said there would be no dramatic changes at the London office.

  • Irish rage as public picks up £7m bill

    13-Aug-1996

    The award of almost IR£7 million in fees to a legal team which represented a company at the centre of a judicial inquiry into the Irish meat industry has provoked a storm of protest in Eire.Senior counsel Dermot Gleeson, who led a team representing Goodman International at the inquiry, has been awarded fees of almost £1 million. Ironically, he has since become Attorney General and because of his personal involvement, cannot now advise the government on whether ...

  • IT brings librarians to book

    13-Aug-1996

    Medium-sized firms do not possess the resources in finance, space or personnel to match large firms. Nevertheless, they face the same demands for up-to-date legal information and quick access to a wide range of sources is essential.Librarians in medium-sized firms are one-stop information shops. If the information required is not in the library, they must know where and how to get it, and the challenge is increased because more often than not they are ...

  • IT use levels off but 95 per cent of users are upgrading

    13-Aug-1996

    Computer use has reached saturation point among US lawyers, but nearly all small law firms that use IT are upgrading the hardware they have, according to a survey by the American Bar Association.The association's annual survey of automation among law firms with fewer than 20 lawyers found that computer use has levelled off at 84 per cent of firms. But 95 per cent of them said they had invested in new hardware this year and 28 per cent of respondents are now ...

  • Law Commission's 'trendies' label sticks

    13-Aug-1996

    A senior barrister has failed in her bid to come to the aid of the Law Commission by reporting allegations made in the Daily Mail that it is run by "fashionable liberals" to the Press Complaints Commission (PCC).Josephine Hayes, of 3 New Square, complained to the PCC that a series of articles by the Daily Mail last October about the Law Commission's role in the Family Homes and Domestic Violence Bill were based on ignorance of the present law and a lack of proper research.

  • Linklaters' derivatives expert goes to City rival

    13-Aug-1996

    City-based firm Clifford Chance has poached derivatives lawyer Claude Brown from Linklaters & Paines.Brown, who will focus on developing new derivatives products, largely over-the-counter (OTC) derivatives in emerging markets, said of his move: "In today's global derivatives market, it is the genuinely ...

  • Litigation Disciplinary Tribunals 13/08/96

    13-Aug-1996

    Brian William Robert Bennett, 63, admitted 1958, Daviv Richard Chetwyn, 46, admitted 1979, Allan James Beard, 48, admitted 1981, who practised at material times in partnership as Bennett & Co, Truro and Newquay, Cornwall, fined £2,000, £1,000 and struck off respectively. Allegations substantiated they failed to keep properly written accounts, wrongly drew money from client account. Allegations ...

  • Litigation Personal Injury 13/08/96

    13-Aug-1996

    Quested v HW Sladden and Co - QBD 18 July 1996Claimant: Alan Quested, 56Incident: AsbestosisInjuries: Claimant joined Canterbury-based company (defendants) in 1963 as pipe fitter and worked his way up to become a director of the company in 1990; however, he died in August 1995 of asbestosis said to have developed as a result of his work as a pipe fitterAward: £175,000 (agreed damages)Judge: Judge Simon ...

  • Litigation Recent Decisions 13/08/96

    13-Aug-1996

    Material difference other than sex justifying unequal payBritish Coal Corporation v Smith & ors (1996).HL (Lords Keith, Browne-Wilkinson, Slynn, Steyn and Hoffmann) 22/5/96.Summary: Employer fails to discharge burden of proof that difference in pay between men and women employees was not because of the difference in sex.Appeal by British Coal Corporation against CA decision (28/4/94) dismissing its appeal against the EAT ...

  • Litigation Writs 13/08/96

    13-Aug-1996

    On-Site Cleaning Services, of Wandsworth, London SW18, has issued a writ against Sutton man David Brown seeking damages for libel, slander and injurious falsehood. The writ comes after telephone conversations Brown is said to have made to the company's customers and in letters the company says he threatened to send to customers. The company seeks an injunction restraining further publication of the alleged libel, slander and injurious falsehood and is seeking ...

  • Lyell to contest High Court spy ruling

    13-Aug-1996

    The Attorney General Sir Nicholas Lyell is not one to take defeat in the High Court lying down.Lyell is appealing a decision to turn down his bid to recover £90,000 which Soviet spy George Blake is said to have made from a book published about his years with the Secret Intelligence Service (SIS).In April this year, Vice Chancellor Sir Richard Scott ruled that Blake, who escaped from Wormwood Scrubs prison, London, in 1966, ...

  • Medium firms reap reward of targeting

    13-Aug-1996

    Specialist small firms can take heart from the latest Acquisitions Monthly tables on UK public company takeover advisory work. The tables show the strides these firms have made in picking up lucrative corporate finance contracts in the past year.While Linklaters & Paines, Slaughter and May and ...

  • Personal injury seminar raises money for charity

    13-Aug-1996

    John Malpas reportsTHE TAKINGS of a seminar on personal injury law have been donated to a charity which helps head injury victims.The Headway National Head Injuries Association was the grateful recipient of the £1,500 raised at the seminar held jointly by common law set Goldsmith Building and forensic accountants Frenkel Topping Structured Settlements.It focused on claims involving future loss, structured settlements or special needs ...

  • Peter Bullock considers a landmark appeal ruling in IT law.

    13-Aug-1996

    Peter Bullock is a partner in the IT department at Masons.The Court of Appeal's judgment in St Albans v ICL is probably the most important IT law decision this decade. Three issues arise for those involved with commercial software development contracts.First, the software under consideration was undergoing development and a defect caused loss to St Albans Council before the contractual delivery date. ICL was held liable and the court ruled software ...

  • Pilot project eases way for English to practice in US

    13-Aug-1996

    US LAWYERS have agreed to a New York pilot project to make it easier for English lawyers to practice in the US.The agreement was forged between the American Bar Association (ABA) and the Law Society at a pre-arranged private meeting at Orlando, Florida, during the convention.At the meeting, ABA executive director Robert Stein and other senior ABA executives responsible for lawyers' education, agreed to an experiment in New York in which rules allowing English ...

  • Property

    13-Aug-1996

    DJ Freeman acted for Ralph Lauren in acquiring the lease of 1-5 New Bond Street, London, from a subsidiary of Chesterfield. The building will house the new UK and European retail headquarters of Ralph Lauren.

  • RSI claim gets all clear

    13-Aug-1996

    A Court of Appeal ruling last month has paved the way for a legal debate to continue over the rights of those seeking damages for repetitive strain injury. The Appeal Court, by a two-to-one majority, held that secretary Ann Pickford who claims she developed chronic RSI through speed typing, had not been fully advised to take rest periods and that her symptoms were not "hysterical" in origin. The decision paves the way for Pickford to continue with her compensation ...

  • SCB takes flak as clerk takes blame

    13-Aug-1996

    A solicitors disciplinary tribunal has criticised the Solicitors Complaints Bureau for allowing a clerk to take the public blame for his firm's breach of Law Society rules.In its recent judgment of the conduct of Peter Elvidge, former clerk at Plymouth-based Howard & Over, the tribunal asked why the firm's partners had not also been called to face charges that the firm had breached Solicitors Investment Business Rules and Solicitors Practice Rules.The ...

  • The Lawyer Inquiry: Stephen Ramsey

    13-Aug-1996

    Stephen Ramsey was born in Stockport on 11 November 1961. He now lives in Witney, Oxfordshire and is company secretary and in-house lawyer at National Wind Power. What was your first job?Bouncer.What was your first ever salary as a lawyer?£8,000.What would you have done if you hadn't become a lawyer?I never tried not to. In dreams a travel writer, in ...

  • The way to do it...

    13-Aug-1996

    Advocacy training for English pupil barristers has recently been revolutionised by a method of training introduced by the Australian judiciary. It has been adapted and developed by the Inns of Court and now forms the basis of continuing education for pupils. The philosophy of the method is simple. It acknowledges that the best way to teach skills is by example and that trainees can only absorb one point at a time.Previously, some took the view that advocacy could not be ...

  • Transfers on the up

    13-Aug-1996

    In the past two years, the number of foreign lawyers taking the Qualified Lawyers Transfer Test (QLTT) has increased steadily, according to Colin Gillespie, clerk to the QLTT board. The increase to roughly 600 applicants a year has been largely due to new jurisdictions allowed to sit the test, including the US, South Africa and Nigeria.The QLTT was introduced in 1991 to allow foreign lawyers to qualify as solicitors in England and Wales. "It is a standard exam designed to ...

  • Vaudreys closes department as two family lawyers defect

    13-Aug-1996

    Manchester firm Vaudreys has closed its family law department following the departure of its two family practitioners to neighbouring firm Lace Mawer.Vaudreys assumed Caroline Bor and Sally Merry would take most of their clients with them and so decided to close shop. Their move also co incides with the departure of the firm's corporate partner Paul Brown to Cobbett Leak Almond in ManchesterBor and Merry, who were employed under a job share scheme at Vaudreys, ...

  • Watchdog lawyer on the move

    13-Aug-1996

    Consumers Association senior lawyer Keith Richards, the author of the damning Which? survey into the quality and cost of legal advice, is to leave after 10 years for a newly-created in-house post at the Association of British Travel Agents.Barrister Richards becomes Abta's first head of consumer affairs on 1 September, heading two departments - one handling enquiries and complaints from the public about Abta members, the other dealing with claims on Abta bonds and insolvency ...

  • Who will fight for the CPS now?

    13-Aug-1996