How to lose followers on Twitter – a helpful guide for lawyers and legal journalists

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  • I think it helps that you Tweet a lot, and that you are very generous in engaging with and promoting others. Also, your Tweets come across as warm, humorous and human, which is why I followed you.
    Did you get a big spike in followers around the time of #twitterjoketrial? Often, being well-known outside Twitter will attract a lot of followers.

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  • DOES THIS MEAN I HAVE TO GET A TWITTER ACCOUNT NOW ....

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  • Like other areas of life, popularity/notoriety on social media is self-propelling - the more you engage with your audience, the more they engage with you and each other. Probably the most important advice above is not to take un/following personally - people's motives are genuinely not worth analysis, and as long as one is personable, human and informative in one's tweets, a happy medium is to be found. (and in answer to penny's comment /question, I first encountered you in the context of Simon Singh but really took notice because of twitter joke (sorry if this is duplicated, I'm typing on my phone)

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  • Or as in your case block those whom are either bettering you in an argument or when they point out an inaccuracy.

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  • Green is an example of one of those new breed of people who treat numbers of followers on twitter as something akin to a badge of honour. He appears to leap onto every bandwagon going, including the recent pornography case at Kingston Crown Court in an effort to increase his following.
    However he doesn't like criticism, even when justified. I know of several examples, including recently a senior lawyer, where he has blocked tweeters after being correctly challenged.
    Sadly social media provides a platform for his ilk who seek to pontificate and self aggrandise.

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  • Thank you for all the lovely comments!

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  • Prue - yes. But first learn some basic online etiquette ie that writing in caps is the equivalent of shouting. Pipe down!

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  • I agree with Tim. Green is a self-publicist of some genius, and a classic "reinventer" (a strong Tory well into his 20s, it doesn't work out for him as a commercial lawyer, and Lo! He's suddenly a liberal lawyer offering opinions whenever it gets him attention). The Twitter joke trial was a fine example of this, a pure construct of Green, with a little help from Fry and Murray. No cause célèbre at all: Chambers pleaded guilty after a duff legal ruling by magistrates, and he was unlucky on first appeal to come before a particularly asinine circuit judge, sitting with two more lay justices. It goes to the High Court and is put right. At the heart of the case a very simple point with a very simple answer - was the tweet menacing? What exactly was Green's role in this, as solicitor? The appeal required no preparation at all and would have been entirely advicate driven. But look at the self-generated coverage and you would think Mr Green was the capes crusader.

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  • May I suggest a new law of the internet? Allen's Law - If the author of a piece states they have not committed a humble brag, then one must deduce their humble brag is compounded by an infinite degree
    As for how to gather Twitter followers, a cynic may suggest becoming involved with a high-profile court case, even if one's direct legal experience is utterly irrelevant.

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  • @James Walsh
    "The Twitter joke trial was a fine example of this, a pure construct of Green, with a little help from Fry and Murray."
    It was more that it was of natural interest to tweeters and it was the first case of its kind to get to appeal.
    "No cause célèbre at all: Chambers pleaded guilty after a duff legal ruling by magistrates..."
    Incorrect. There was no "legal lruling by magistrates". Paul pleaded guilty before a single district judge who then allowed him to vacate the plea.
    "...and he was unlucky on first appeal to come before a particularly asinine circuit judge, sitting with two more lay justices."
    The Crown Court appeal was the first time lay magistrates were involved.
    "It goes to the High Court and is put right."
    At the first High Court hearing the judges were split 1:1. Exceptionally, and only for second time this century, the court had to reconvene with three judges. Not very straightforward.
    "At the heart of the case a very simple point with a very simple answer - was the tweet menacing?"
    With benefit of hindsight, yes. But until High Court decision, it was not clear what, if any, basis an appeal may be suceessful on.
    "What exactly was Green's role in this, as solicitor? The appeal required no preparation at all and would have been entirely advicate [sic] driven."
    Indeed, I was part of a team and we worked well together.
    "But look at the self-generated coverage and you would think Mr Green was the capes [sic] crusader."
    A little harsh? You will see that John Cooper did most of the press and TV coverage on verdict, not me. For a supposed "self-publicist", I am dreadful with cameras and microphones!

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