Categories:Middle East

The promising land

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  • If you need first-class legal translation from and into Hebrew and Arabic, look no further. We are the only translation company in the UK run by Israelis (Jewish and Arab) to offer high-quality British and U.S. legal services.

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  • Israel bar is still over protecting its lawyers with unfair requirements for foreign lawyers who wants to pass the transfer test. Indeed it is not at all a "transfer test", the bar requires 9 written exams in order to be only allowed to pass the israeli bar exam! 9 exams+1 year trainee+ Israeli exam (the same than israelis!)= around 2-3 years.
    For an Israeli who wants to pass a transfer test in almost any other country it would take him few months and it is a real transfer test, not the same than locals of course. This is a pure injustice. question: how many israelis could pass for instance the real Paris bar exam? answer almost 0%.
    Israel market is an over protected market, israeli bar acts in this way, it is time to change and the new rules are far from being enough. Tell me why do they expect that the lawyer should have worked at least 5 years in his country?! Does the israeli bar means that foreign diplomas are not good enough?
    I invite all foreign lawyers who wants to work in Israel to wake up and require from israeli bar the right to work after the 9 exams and the trainee without having to pass the israeli bar exam. Reciprocity between foreign bar exams and Israeli bar now.

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  • Please note that we have Michael Miller who has received authorisation from the English Bar Association to advise overseas on English law in Israel and he has also qualified as an Israeli lawyer who can advise in English!

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  • I did not understand that last bit about aliyah. That many Jewish lawyers wish to move to Israel, I understand. But why on Earth would this discourage foreign law firms from setting up in Israel? On the contrary, isn't it an incentive to think that, by setting up in Israel, they can attract more and more motivated talent?
    If I were a top law firm and I thought that, by setting up an Israeli law office, I could be extremely selective and populate it with a cadre of Israel-called lawyers as well as very high quality New York, London, and Paris qualified lawyers that can pitch in both locally and to accompany my offices in those jurisdictions -- well, I would have thought that would be a rather interesting proposition. Is the article saying the opposite? I didn't quite get it.

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