Access Denied: Infiltrating the bar

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  • Your modesty alone should guarantee you an easy ride.

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  • "I find it difficult to pinpoint anything that is designed to facilitate the career of an intelligent and capable woman who has chosen to have children first" - that is absolutely correct and I'm not sure why the Bar is singled out for complaint.
    Unfortunately, the same thing may be said about many other lines of work. Are law firms really that much better on this front? Your own experience with application forms for vacation schemes at would suggest not. I imagine the same point applies to banks and accountancy firms. It certainly applies to advertising firms, TV production companies and TV channels.
    All of this is unlikely to change any time in the near future, not least because the women (and men) you refer to are very much in the minority.
    But it's not immediately clear to me why the path to a career at the Bar ought to be designed to facilitate the position of women (or men) who decide to have children first.
    Is it not the case that the price you pay for having seen more of your children at an earlier age than many barristers or "big law firm" lawyers do is that the fact that you have children (and, for example, childcare commitments) means that you are not in as good a position to compete for places? I'm not sure it's fair to blame anyone for that - it's simply a predictable side-effect of the choices you made (for which I applaud you - this is not to criticise).
    Good luck with your search for a career at the Bar from a barrister who was neither parentally-funded nor who wielded internships when applying for pupillage.

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  • You can study the BPTC part-time in many places and combine it with a full- or part-time job. It's not easy, but it's doable (particularly if you have a supportive partner).
    Also, the author doesn't say what she was doing before going to university at 29. If it was "just" staying home and having kids, that's a profile that's going to be off-putting to most graduate employers, not just the bar. If there was work experience there, the trick is to show how some of it was transferrable to the Bar e.g. dealing with members of the public/customer service, problem solving etc. It's not easy, but you need to sell yourself as someone they want to take on.

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  • I don't understand. If you always wanted to be a barrister why did you not obtain excellent A levels. I read law at 17, a year young. I graduated at 20. I worked in the City. I had 2 weeks to have each baby. I was qualified as a solicitor at 23. You chose a route that no one with sense or ability to read the internet would ever choose and then complain the route did not work. Why choose that wrong route?

    I am Northern. I had 3 babies by age of 26. I made my way pretty well. However I made the right choices and you made the wrong ones.

    We want the bset people to get into the best law firms and barrister chambers, not those who made the wrong choices early on. We need the bright ones. Not the ones who make obvious mistakes.

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  • If you can't even manage to apply pupillage due to your family commitments, how on earth do you think you'll cope when you're practising as a barrister.

    If you're good enough you'll get an Inn scholarship and won't have to pay for the BPTC, which you can do part time.

    Your real problem is the chip on your shoulder.

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  • The Anonymous woman who comments that she does not understand, above, neatly exhibits why everyone should be outraged by the Bar and what goes on there interminably.
    The article is written objectively with insight. The Anonymous comment comes from a point of evident blinkered ignorance - NOT the sort of person anyone should want, or ever find, representing them in law anywhere. No doubt she's taking home a couple of hundred grand a year for making poor quality representations in a self satisfied, totally self confirming and congratulatory way; and feeling great and good for being mediocre. There is little justice in law unless you are exceptionally well off in this country. Perhaps this is the way it is all over the world.
    Just because it's the way it is doesn't mean the status quo should not be attacked.
    When you are not part of the legal edifice the law seems very different to those of you who are immured in its nuance, complexity and often down right utter English class ridden goobledigook. M'Lud.
    The law is an ass, most particularly often when the brains behind it are those of blinkered asses.
    This is the view of a totally legally uneducated lay person who's been in court quite often and paid £thousands to be poorly represented by suits with big brains who simply appear incapable of listening, noting and inwardly digesting their brief because they are too busy having a conversation with themselves about how brilliant they are.
    Oh yes. There are a lot of hangovers around too.

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  • Brilliant. There goes another anonymous barrister with their own chip on THEIR shoulder.

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  • "I don't understand. If you always wanted to be a barrister why did you not obtain excellent A levels. I read law at 17, a year young. I graduated at 20. I worked in the City. I had 2 weeks to have each baby. I was qualified as a solicitor at 23. You chose a route that no one with sense or ability to read the internet would ever choose and then complain the route did not work. Why choose that wrong route?
    I am Northern. I had 3 babies by age of 26. I made my way pretty well. However I made the right choices and you made the wrong ones.
    We want the bset people to get into the best law firms and barrister chambers, not those who made the wrong choices early on. We need the bright ones. Not the ones who make obvious mistakes."
    What a pity that the anonymous author of the above comment appears unable to apply her superior ability to gaining an understanding of the basic principle that everyone is different and not all in society have the opportunity or ability to undertake what they might wish to do at any given time.
    I am quite appalled that someone who must be educated to a reasonable standard can be so blinkered and apparently lacking in moral fibre.
    I have also qualified as a solicitor. I qualified at the age of 37 and with 2 kids in tow. Does this make me less able than Ms Anonymous? No it doesn't (I won a scholarship based on excellence so am clearly capable). I also have masses of life experience which is to the benefit of my employer and my clients...some may even dare to suggest that this is far more appealing than employing someone fresh out of university at 20 something years old with no clue about what goes on in the real world.
    I hope that the article's author chooses to continue, she will be an asset to the profession.

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  • Forgive me but I think that some of the post here are a bit condascending. Everybody's circumstances are different and I can completely understand the author of this article. My own story is that during the second year of my law degree both my mother and I lost our jobs, my father took a stroke and I had to care for him, due to the financial strain I almost had to drop out of university and then my grandfather died and I became ill on top of it all. Small blip in my second year results but I did go on to achieve a very strong 2:1 and have 4 years legal experience behind me and graduated debt free in the end. I hope that none of the posters have to deal with stressful times given the attitudes of some.

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  • At top Chancery sets, over 90% of tenants (certainly at the junior end) went to independent schools. Polo clubs are more meritocratic and diverse than some parts of the Bar.

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