Categories:Middle East

Trowers exits Jeddah after less than a year

  • Print
  • Comments (9)

Readers' comments (9)

  • Actually, most firms practicing in the Middle East are recruiting again now - some very aggressively - having been on the lean side/at low utilisation for the best part of 2 years. Of course, they need to appear credible when pitching for the new waves of infrastructure and private equity M&A work resulting from the high oil price.
    After several years of punching above its weight, Trowers is now in the difficult position of being without a key partner in a crowded club of sub-Magic Circle newcomers eager to make names for themselves and competing on rates, something the market is much more sensitive these days.
    Could be tough times ahead for the firm...

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • It is only a matter of time before it's curtains for their Riyadh office too. Watch the space...

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Trowers' Dubai office has been decimated too. There were around 30 lawyers there three years ago, now they're down to a dozen. Even that's unsustainable.
    They even had to change the locks to keep out one of the axed partners.
    Bottom line: firms need to offer more than colonial arrogance to thrive in Dubai these days.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Trowers could easily be the next law firm casualty. Are they a City firm or a regional firm? Are they a City firm in respect of work (corporate / banking) or a property and social housing firm? If you are a leading transactional lawyer or client, why would you go to Trowers? Do they have any big clients or do they just pick up the scraps from 'City' firms. Are they a domestic firm or an international firm? I look at them and it is like trying to make a jigsaw with odd bits from other jigsaws.
    In a positive sense, a good firm for an outside investor to target perhaps?

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Looks like Trowers is getting battered at home (as their core public sector work dries up) and away (the Middle East being the only region where they have an overseas presence). Without those two departments thriving, I'm not sure what else would interest a predator. Strange times for a strange firm.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Who was the spokesperson?
    Very hard to service the clients from the Riyadh office when it is only two people.
    Unless of course there are no clients to serve.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • So, lacklustre firm in unsuccessful venture. It's not really that surprising given that Trowers has been falling off the pace in the region for a good few years now.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • All Trowers has done is unwind 95% or so of its 2009 and 2010 recruitment in the region. This is from salaried partner down through the ranks. They did the same thing in 2008.
    Why would anyone join a firm that carries out these "redundancy" exercises with such regularity?

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • That may be so. But the Jeddah debacle was inevitable. The mix of personnel in the office was a disaster waiting to happen and when it did happen T&H moved quickly. Out went the Saudis and back to London went the Brit.
    Market talk is that the Riyadh office is down to one junior lawyer. A good example of T&H's PR being way behind the doings of the management.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

Have your say

Mandatory Required Fields

Mandatory

Comments that are in breach or potential breach of our terms and conditions in particular clause 8, may not be published or, if published, may subsequently be taken down. In addition we may remove any comment where a complaint is made in respect of it. These actions are at our sole discretion.

  • Print
  • Comments (9)