10 August 1998

The Lawyer

  • Banks boycott tobacco shares

    12-Aug-1998

    Investment banks HSBC and Dresdner Kleinwort Benson have issued memos to their fund managers instructing them not to buy any more shares of tobacco stock, in advance of this week's tobacco litigation hearing.While Kleinworts warned against further investment in Imperial Tobacco, HSBC warned against further investment in Gallaher and Imperial - both defendants in a PI case brought by 53 cancer victims, represented by Leigh Day & Co.Fear of plummeting tobacco ...

  • Book of the week

    12-Aug-1998

    The Prisons Handbook By Mark LeechA kind of Lonely Planet for lags, this "tour de force through current penal policy and practice" is written by Mark Leech who, after spending 20 years in 62 of Britain's prisons, knows his stuff. The former armed robber touches on every aspect of prison life.

  • Breaking down the barriers

    12-Aug-1998

    The harmonisation of insolvency laws across Europe remains uncertain, write Howard Morris and Katharine Theobald. Howard Morris is a partner and Katharine Theobald a solicitor at Denton Hall.The idea of a European Convention on Insolvency Proceedings to harmonise substantive insolvency laws across Europe was first explored in 1960. On 23 November 1995, the convention was signed by all member states, except the UK, the Republic of Ireland, and The Netherlands. ...

  • Case for defence falls victim to bottom line

    12-Aug-1998

    One of the few tangible benefits of British colonialism was that it bequeathed the countries that later became the Commonwealth a strong and independent justice system.So it is ironic that the British Government is now moving to dismantle one of its key elements: the right of defendants to fair, independent representation.The introduction of public defenders, through the Government's proposed Criminal Defence Service, is an example of political ...

  • Cleary Gottlieb appoints

    12-Aug-1998

    US firm Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton has appointed London-based capital markets associate Ashar Qureshi as a partner .Litigation partner Matthew Slater has rejoined the firm's Washington DC office, after serving four years as assistant general counsel of the US Air Force.

  • Clifford Chance in Korean liberalisation drive

    12-Aug-1998

    Clifford Chance is spearheading an attempt to lobby the South Korean authorities for liberalisation of the country's legal market.Foreign firms are currently forbidden from establishing permanent offices in the country or practising local law.James Walker, head of Clifford Chance's Korea practice which is based in Hong Kong, says the firm recently persuaded EU ...

  • Combating racism in the profession

    12-Aug-1998

    It is time for the profession to be made accountable for any racism that exists among its members, argues Raj Joshi. Raj Joshi (a barrister with the CPS) will be a participant at The Letter and Spirit of the Law, an Anglo-US conference on race gate crimes at the Hilton Hotel, Park Lane on Saturday 12 December, organised by the Society of Black Lawyers and supported by The Lawyer.As an immigrant growing up in London, I became aware of just how much of a reality discrimination ...

  • Conditional fees in family law branded 'repugnant'

    12-Aug-1998

    Family lawyers are outraged at the Government's decision to open family law up to conditional fees agreements (CFAs), describing it as "unworkable" and "ridiculous".Partners in the UK's top family law firms said such changes were "anti-family" and they had no idea they were being contemplated.The Government's White Paper on modernising justice, released by the Lord Chancellor's Department last week, promised to extend CFAs into matrimonial ...

  • Corporate investors' risk costs will rise under SFA

    12-Aug-1998

    Corporate investors at Lloyd's are likely to see the costs of underwriting rise as the insurance market is brought under the direct supervision of the Financial Services Authority (FSA).The current draft of the Financial Services and Markets Bill gives extensive supervisory powers to the FSA over Lloyd's, and the City regulator is likely to push the Government's strategy of protecting insurance policy holders.Leah Dunlop, a Lloyd's specialist ...

  • Cutting corners on criminal defence

    12-Aug-1998

    In the first part of our special report on public defenders, Chris Fogarty looks at the Government's plans and questions how the Bar Council can fight the proposals.The Government took one of its bigger political gambles when it signalled the arrival of public defenders in England and Wales in the Queen's Speech last week.The Lord Chancellor Lord Irvine has not only flown in the face of predictable opposition from the Bar, but has also provoked the ...

  • Daughter fights will decision

    12-Aug-1998

    Sandra Espinosa, a Blackpool woman who looked after her father during the last seven years of his life, but was left nothing of an estate worth u200,000, has challenged a High Court ruling that she was not entitled to any provision from her father's will. She is also challenging Mr Justice Johnson's dismissal of her application under the Inheritance (Provision for Family and Dependents) Act 1975. Judgment has been reserved.

  • David Ligertwood on a football players's on-pitch liability. David Ligertwood is a solicitor at Townleys.

    12-Aug-1998

    A Bradford City footballer has been awarded u50,000 interim compensation in the High Court, following a tackle inflicted by a Huddersfield Town defender.Kevin Gray's high tackle, which fractured Gordon Watson's leg in two places and sidelined him for 20 months, was described as "appaling" by expert witness Jimmy Hill. The action was to establish liability only. Damages will be awarded next year.The trial consisted of four ...

  • Decree of confusion

    12-Aug-1998

    The Vietnamese government has issued decree 92, which allows foreign firms to register up to two branch offices in the country. It supersedes decree 42, issued in 1995, which also allowed firms to open two branch offices.

  • Defamation gatekeepers must exercise caution

    12-Aug-1998

    Tim Watkin examines the reasoning behind, and consequences of, Peter Carter-Ruck's decision to fight libel cases on a no win-no fee basis.When Tom Cruise stood outside the High Court last month to proclaim victory for himself and his family over Express Newspapers, it served as a reminder that defamation law is as much the preserve of the wealthy as the designer suit he was wearing. Traditionally, the rich have been the only ones able to afford a reputation.

  • Divorce is no place for 'nasty' lawyers

    12-Aug-1998

    Leading playwright Terence Frisby believes that the legal profession is ill-equipped to deal with the emotive issues that surround divorce proceedings.It was when a member of staff at the Royal Courts of Justice held a door for me, touched his cap and said, "Morning, Mr Frisby", that I realised something had gone seriously wrong in my life.The problem was my divorce, which created litigation that went on for 15 years. ...

  • Ex-offenders group chair backs clean slate plan

    12-Aug-1998

    Mark Leech, chairman of ex-offenders lobby and support group UNLOCK, this week backed proposals to wipe clean the records of ex-offenders.Last week, The Lawyer exclusively revealed details of the scheme, which is being considered by Home Secretary Jack Straw.In a preface to the 1999 edition of The Prisons Handbook he supports plans for reform of the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 to establish a Criminal Records Tribunal which would have the power to suspend ...

  • Fear not, the road to change is safe

    12-Aug-1998

    The independent bar in New Zealand is thriving - proof that chambers there will survive, argues Andrew Ayres.The future of the Bar has never been more uncertain than now.The Lord Chancellor, Lord Irvine has promised to make inroads into the Bar's monopoly on rights of audience in the higher courts, and the joint education of solicitors and barristers is being mooted.The vision of a fused profession is no longer unthinkable and ...

  • Flotation

    12-Aug-1998

    John MacFarlane at McGrigor Donald advised Burn Stewart Distillers on a u44.5m refinancing and further facilities loan from the Royal Bank of Scotland

  • Flotation

    12-Aug-1998

    Richard Lee of Addleshaw Booth & Co advised Airtours on its u250m offering of Subordinate Convertible Bonds to shareholders.

  • Foil firmly backs Woolf's vision

    12-Aug-1998

    Write to: The Editor, The Lawyer, 50 Poland Street, London W1V 4AX, fax 0171 578 7249, e-mail lawyer.edit@chiron.co.uk, DX44700 Soho Square.In City Lawyer's report, "ADR's latest threat to City litigators" (The Lawyer 24 November), it was incorrect to link my name, the Forum of Insurance Lawyers (Foil) or my firm with the suggestion that I, and we, are not embracing Woolf's vision.

  • Former Soviet and Yugoslavian states slammed for slow reform

    12-Aug-1998

    Former Soviet and Yugoslavian republics have come under fire from the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) for being slow to reform their legal and law enforcement systems.In its Transition Report 1998, covering central and eastern Europe, countries such as Bosnia and Herzegovina, Ukraine, Kazakhstan and Russia have been slammed for failing to modernise.The report cited the inability to enforce civil and foreign judgments, dragged-out court ...

  • Govt to ration legal aid cases

    12-Aug-1998

    Clients seeking legal aid are at risk of having their cases turned down if Community Legal Services overrun their budget and their cases are not judged to be high priority.After the release last week of the White Paper, Modernising Justice, Hoon said: "If we start hugely over-spending on the budget we would have to rein that in and we would have to make judgements about what are priority cases," he said.The legal reforms hinge on the premise that legal aid costs ...

  • Hammonds' employment head quits for Norton Rose

    12-Aug-1998

    Hammond Suddards has been hit by the departure of its national head of employment and another leading employment partner.Tim Russell - overall head of employment at the firm - is joining City firm Norton Rose in March as head of employment, while Chris Southam is going to Osborne Clarke.Russell ...

  • Herbert Smith asks partners to resign in shipping shake-up

    12-Aug-1998

    Herbert Smith has asked the bulk of its shipping department to resign in a major strategic overhaul.London-based partners Nicholas Robinson, Charles Baker and Mike Allen will be leaving the firm in the next few weeks, although it is understood that none have finalised their future plans.The remaining two partners - Charles Kaplan in Paris and George Lamplough in Hong Kong - and those assistants that decide to stay with the firm, will have their shipping practices ...

  • Human rights pay price of cost curbs

    12-Aug-1998

    US lawyers believe that introducing a public defender system in Britain would be a mistake, writes Morag Preston.Nobody is surprised when the UK takes its lead from the US. British pubs, shops and television channels have all been revamped the US way. Now it is the turn of the British justice system.But some US lawyers are uneasy that the British government is taking steps to set up a public defender system modelled on their own. They acknowledge that maybe, ...

  • In brief: Condon attacks Jack Straw's spending plans

    12-Aug-1998

    Sir Paul Condon, the Metropolitan Police Commissioner, has attacked Jack Straw's u29m spending increase for the Metropolitan Police. He told The Lawyer: "This falls short of what we need to cover inflation and increases in police pay and pensions," he said. The funding settlement is one per cent below the national average and could lead to job losses.

  • In brief: Davies Arnold Cooper hires two new partners

    12-Aug-1998

    Davies Arnold Cooper has hired two new partners. Allan Reason, formerly of Pinsent Curtis, has joined the London office as a banking partner and Phil Jepson, formerly of Dibb Lupton Alsop, has become head of common law for the firm's Manchester and Newcastle offices.

  • In brief: Eversheds launches EU public affairs service

    12-Aug-1998

    Eversheds has launched an EU public affairs service in Brussels. The service will be headed up by Wilfred Aspinall, former member of the European Union economic and social committee until earlier this year, and John Grayston, the firm's resident partner.

  • In brief: Eversheds, Birmingham recruits from rivals

    12-Aug-1998

    Eversheds' Birmingham office has hired two partners from national rivals. Commercial property partner Mike O'Sullivan is joining from Edge Ellison and insurance partner Geoff Owen is joining from Dibb Lupton Alsop. Meanwhile another Dibbs' partner, David Maples, is leaving the firm's Manchester office to join the Liverpool office of

  • In brief: Human Rights Institute workload rises

    12-Aug-1998

    The Human Rights Institute (HRI) has sent out 30 letters of protest concerning specific human rights violations involving lawyers, compared to 15 in 1995. Similarly, early reports of statistics for the period 1997/98 from the International Commission of Jurist's publication Attacks on Justice, show a marked increase from their figures for 1996.

  • In brief: LAB pays out £500,000 in Hendrix case

    12-Aug-1998

    The Legal Aid Board (LAB) payed out a massive u500,000 in costs on one case last week. Daniel Secunda received legal aid for 10 years in a breach of contract battle with PMSA, a recording company, over rights to a live Jimi Hendrix album.

  • In brief: Linklaters & Alliance marketing manager quits

    12-Aug-1998

    Linklaters & Alliance has lost PR manager Rachel Penfound to City rival Freshfields, where she will be in charge of marketing the firm's litigation department. Acting head Mark King said the firm is continuing its two-year long search for a permanent head of marketing.

  • In brief: Lord Clinton-Davis returns to SJ Berwin

    12-Aug-1998

    Lord Clinton-Davis, minister for trade at the Department of Trade and Industry from May 1997 until the reshuffle in July 1998, has rejoined SJ Berwin as a consultant on EU and government affairs.

  • In brief: Patent Office puts trade mark register online

    12-Aug-1998

    The Patent Office has posted the UK trade marks register on the Internet. The new service will be of use to anyone needing to demonstrate or verify the ownership or status of a trade mark on the register. Peter Lawrence, director of trade marks at the Patent Office, said the move was "the latest phase in our strategy to bring intellectual property rights to a wider audience by cutting fees and improving access".

  • In brief: Profile

    12-Aug-1998

    In last week's profile, it was incorrectly stated that President Kaunda was formerly president of Zambia, instead of Zaire. It was also stated that the Bruce Grobbelaar libel action was against News of the World. It was against The Sun. Lord Aldington was the the plaintiff in the libel action brought against Count Tolstoy. The errors made were the responsibility of The Lawyer.

  • Insolvency law: build not bust

    12-Aug-1998

    Insolvency lawyers are shedding their reputation for picking over corporate carcasses, writes Anne McGrath.Amid continuing uncertainty over Britain's ability to head off a recession, one certainty remains - should the current slow down surge into recessionary proportions, insolvency solicitors will be fully geared up for it.There has been clear evidence of firms beefing up their insolvency capability since the last recession. Stephen Gale, who ...

  • It has been a bad week for...

    12-Aug-1998

    Veteran real estate lawyer H Harding Brown (no, seriously, that really is his name), who faces paying out $US5m for legal malpractice. An American court found that the real estate deal he was working on went sour after Harding Brown went on holiday, leaving the complex transaction in the hands of a junior.Sir Louis Blom-Cooper QC, who is being sued by two of the Birmingham Six after he alleged that the case against them for a 1974 pub ...

  • It has been a good week for...

    12-Aug-1998

    The Goldsmith Goal Setters, who conquered 12 other teams to win the Bar Sports Law Group five-a-side Charity Football Tournament. With an enviable 16 goals scored, but only three conceded - the case for the defence prevailing, presumably - and under the able management of Edith "senior clerk" Robertson, the team from Goldsmith chambers were cock-a-hoop. "In the best traditions of the Bar, we were well briefed, thoroughly prepared and lucky,"

  • Law centre first victim of franchising deadline

    12-Aug-1998

    A Catch 22 situation has placed North Lewisham Law Centre in danger of becoming the first victim of the deadline for legal aid franchising - condemned as "too tight" by legal aid practitioners and the Law Society.The centre has not yet applied for a franchise - the deadline for which is 31 December - and its chance to do so is being jeopardised as Lewisham Borough Council has threatened to withdraw its funding from the law centre.The council will make its final ...

  • Lawyers at play

    12-Aug-1998

    More a case of lawyers in play, with Barney Corrigan from Newcastle firm Dickinson Dees pictured above with a prop from a children's Christmas play that the firm is sponsoring. It's about a picture-book small town where "the sky starts changing colour".Other plot lines, including the one where Newcastle wins the Premiership, were thought to be too far-fetched.

  • Leap of faith for merger reforms

    12-Aug-1998

    Mike Yuille says the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry's regulatory proposals will increase his popularity among City lawyers.Trade and Industry Secretary Peter Mandelson will find his stock rising among City lawyers when he publishes his plans to take the politics out of the competition regulation of takeovers and mergers.It may be a knee-jerk reaction to the hostile press he received over the BSkyB bid for Manchester United, but the ...

  • Legal software vies for market share

    12-Aug-1998

    MANCHESTER personal injury firm Alexander Harris has piloted a new case and practice management system, which has now been sold to London litigation firm Kennedys and launched on the legal marketplace.Altrincham-based computer supplier Jonathan Beck Associates (JBA) has been implementing its Carydan software at 28-fee earner firm Alexander Harris for the past three months, and the ...

  • Liverpool merger creates biggest set in North West

    12-Aug-1998

    The Liverpool bar is set for a shake-up with four sets involved in merger talks.Sources within chambers said that a formal decision has been taken to merge Martin's Building and The Corn Exchange.This will create the largest set in the North West and one of the largest in the country, with nearly 70 members.The new set, to be called Water Street, will specialise in crime, family and personal injury work.Merger talks have also been ...

  • Magyar engages in telecoms deal

    12-Aug-1998

    The London and Warsaw offices of Baker & McKenzie have acted in the largest domestic offering and listing of shares in Poland, doubling the market capitalisation of the Warsaw stock exchange.The u530m offering of shares and GDRs of Polish telecoms giant Telekomunikacja Polska SA (TPSA) also involved a London Stock Exchange offering and listing.The offering consisted ...

  • Martyn Gowar: Caretaker of a princess' estate

    12-Aug-1998

    Philip Hoult talks to Martyn Gowar, the Lawrence Graham senior partner who found himself thrust into a media spotlight.While the media persists in referring to lawyers as "fat cats", Martin Gowar, a solicitor they once vigorously pursued, is quite happy to label journalists as "intellectually lazy".Gowar, the genial, sports-mad ...

  • Milbank Tweed tops global poll

    12-Aug-1998

    Milbank Tweed Hadley & McCloy has won the global top spot as the leading project finance adviser, according to a survey. The US firm advised on 45 transactions worth u20,439m between January 1997 and August 1998.Of the City firms, Allen & Overy beat Clifford Chance to third place, advising on u11,875m ...

  • National Grid pensions appeal

    12-Aug-1998

    Judgment is expected in the Court of Appeal this week in the National Grid pensions case. Pensioners Reg Mayes and David Laws, former employees of the Central Electricity Generating Board, claimed the electricity industry pension surplus had been unlawfully distributed after the gains failed to reach retired workers. The outcome of their appeal is likely to affect 200,000 pensioners along with scheme assets valued at an estimated u1.5bn.

  • Nominal £5 award against firm goes up to £125,000

    12-Aug-1998

    A nominal High Court damages award of £5 against City law firm Macfarlanes has been increased by the Appeal Court to £125,000.The award to Titanic Investments stemmed from a claim over advice given by Macfarlane in respect of a £12m deal involving land at Waltham Chase, Twyford, near Winchester.Land owners Alan Godsal and his wife, Lady Elizabeth Godsal, were ...

  • NYC merger to create US giant

    12-Aug-1998

    New York firms Brown & Wood and White & Case are in merger talks to create a 1,214-lawyer firm - the fourth largest in the US.If the deal goes ahead, White & Case has said the merged firm will look to the UK for a merger partner.John Bellhouse, White & Case executive partner in London, confirmed that negotiations were taking place, but emphasised that they were still at a ...

  • OSS backlog leak fuels new row

    12-Aug-1998

    Pressure mounted on the Law Society to shed its regulatory powers this week, after the Office for the Supervision of Solicitors (OSS) admitted in a leaked letter that it faced a 5,000-file backlog, with an average completion timescale of 27 weeks.In the letter, leaked to The Lawyer, the OSS blamed the backlog on the Summer floods at its Leamington Spa HQ, which destroyed between one and two thousand files, and the roll-out of its new Regional Office Authorisation Device ...

  • Paternal rights gain further impetus

    12-Aug-1998

    The favoured right of mothers to win possession of their children after divorce is no longer set in stone, writes Roger Pearson.Fathers battling for the right to care for their children following a marriage break-up have received a major boost from a senior divorce judge.For many years, the common judicial opinion was that children should remain with their mothers in the majority of cases. But this view has softened in recent years.

  • Plans to reward lawyers for rural work

    12-Aug-1998

    The government could pay lawyers bonuses to work in remote areas under the new contract scheme, said Geoff Hoon, Minister of State at the LCD.Hoon told The Lawyer that the system of only using lawyers contracted to the new Legal Services Commission, introduced in the Access to Justice Bill, would give the Government the ability to channel money into areas where they perceive the need is greatest."In rural areas people have to travel considerable distances to ...

  • Property

    12-Aug-1998

    Gerald Bland at Herbert Smith acted for Standard Life in the pre-letting of its Focus West office development in Hammersmith to cosmetics company L'Oreal for u3m a year. L'Oreal was represented by Monica Blake at DJ Freeman.

  • Property

    12-Aug-1998

    Richard Smith of Nicholson Graham & Jones advised the Sellar Property Group on the purchase of a leasehold in Southwark Towers from Railtrack, who were represented by Cathy Crick of Simmons & Simmons. The deal was completed in 14 days.

  • Property

    12-Aug-1998

    Cliff McAuley and Richard Hopkinson-Woolley of Clifford Chance advised Prestbury Group on the u1m-a-year letting of the Surrey Quays Retail Park to a continental sports retailer. The site will become the country's largest sports superstore.

  • Protecting the debtor

    12-Aug-1998

    Anne McGrath says insolvency law reform is still high up on the Government's agenda.The Queen's Speech has come and gone with n'er a royal whisper of the proposed reform of insolvency law, which Secretary of State for Trade and Peter Mandleson have been strongly pushing for.But the DTI has confirmed that it is still very much to the fore and will appear as soon as legislative time-tabling allows. A DTI spokesman said they were optimistic ...

  • Quote of the week

    12-Aug-1998

    Our idea of a holiday is taking a long weekend in any European city and visiting the art exhibitions."Lord Irvine explains to readers of The Sun that really, he's just like them.

  • Ride operator faces legal rollercoaster

    12-Aug-1998

    Roger Pearson reports on an illiterate ride operative's High Court battle against fairground giant Bob Wilson & Sons.The country's oldest trade union, the Showman's Guild, is facing a High Court challenge from ride operator Barry Print, in a battle over allocation of fairground pitches.In a writ issued on his behalf by Chelmsford firm Wortley Redmayne & Kershaw, Print claims he had established rights of tenure at ...

  • Rural areas left out in the cold by new fixed fee proposals

    12-Aug-1998

    Philip Dry says that in an over-zealous attempt to obtain value for money, the Government has disregarded the issue of access to justice.People would be well advised not to commit a crime on the Hebridean island of North Uist - which, of course, would always be the best advice. If they did, however, they would come within the jurisdiction of Lochmaddy Sheriff Court, which has no solicitors resident within its jurisdiction. And if the Government's proposals ...

  • SIF newsletter will save money

    12-Aug-1998

    Hugh Williams (The Lawyer, 24 November) asks how the cost of publishing the Solicitors Indemnity Fund's quarterly newsletter can be justified. In response, I have no difficulty in approving expenditure that enables the profession's own indemnity scheme to keep in touch with those it serves.SIF in Focus achieves a number of aims. First, it disseminates risk management information which contributes to the profession's risk awareness and provides ...

  • Solicitor advocates one-stop shop is a sham, says Swift

    12-Aug-1998

    A leading silk last week attacked government plans to extend rights of audience for solicitors in the higher courts, insisting that in practice the one-stop shop is a sham.In June the Lord Chancellor, Lord Irvine, said all solicitors would be granted rights of audience on their first day of admission and legislation is expected to be included in the Access to Justice Bill.But Malcolm Swift QC, leader of the North Eastern Circuit, claimed the idea that solicitor ...

  • Solicitors give White Paper thumbs up

    12-Aug-1998

    Despite fierce Bar Council opposition to extending rights of audience, the legal profession is overwhelmingly supporting the Lord Chancellor's consultation paper.Of 100 responses to the paper, 64 backed the proposals, 12 opposed, 11 were neutral or did not comment, and 13 were mixed.The paper, which outlined plans to allow solicitors and Crown prosecutors to speak in higher courts, went out in June and is part of the criminal justice reforms set out in the ...

  • Suicide triggers alarm over stress levels

    12-Aug-1998

    A highly regarded and long standing adviser to the Law Society has committed suicide amid growing alarm about the stress faced by solicitors.Mystery surrounds why Andrew Williamson, sole principal of Nottinghamshire firm Williamsons, took his life, but his death comes only weeks after a report showed that solicitors suffered more stress than junior doctors.The Trainee Solicitors Group (TSG) also recently revealed a huge rise in the number of calls to its helpline ...

  • Survey reveals threat to IP rights

    12-Aug-1998

    Investors in IT, telecoms and life sciences companies risk throwing money away because they do not monitor the protection of their intellectual property (IP) rights, research has found.A survey of over 100 companies, conducted by the London Business School and sponsored by City firm Taylor Joynson Garrett, revealed that half the investors in these fast-growing sectors fail to monitor the protection of their knowledge base.The survey also revealed a poor approach ...

  • The Lawyer Inquiry: Jeremy Irwin-Singer

    12-Aug-1998

    Jeremy Irwin-Singer was born in London in 1951. He is a partner at Linnells.What was your first job?Wringing chickens' necks on a chicken farm in Wales.What was your first ever salary as a lawyer?u1,196 pa.What would you have done if you hadn't been a lawyer?Become a TV presenter.What was your most satisfying professional moment?

  • Tuckers to bill state for 'thinking time'

    12-Aug-1998

    A London criminal law firm is to lodge an appeal with the Supreme Court Taxing Office taxing master claiming legal aid money for "thinking time".If the claim - brought by criminal law firm Tuckers - is successful, lawyers will be able to charge the public purse for time spent thinking about cases in the bath or on the train home from work.Tuckers claimed for 150 hours of non-recorded thinking time - which amounted to three hours a week - for its work on a computer ...

  • UK 'lock-in' deters investors

    12-Aug-1998

    Immigration solicitors have warned that wealthy entrepreneurs and millionaire investors visiting the UK will be "locked" into the country for three months, owing to Home Office personnel and computing problems.The Home Office wrote to immigration solicitors last month, warning them that business immigration applications for businesspersons and investors received after 7 December would go into storage for December, January and February, as a result of the roll-out of its ...